A Photo Tour of Colonial Williamsburg

Williamsburg

WMay 

Colonial Williamsburg, an 18th-century outdoor history museum, transports visitors back in time to the period of the American Revolution. The Historic Area of Colonial Williamsburg includes 88 original 18th-century structures and hundreds of houses, shops and public outbuildings that have been reconstructed on their original foundations. Williamsburg is a great place to visit and learn about American history. See these photos and get a glimpse of the Historic Area.

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Governors Palace

Governors Palace

Richard Cummins

Colonial Williamsburg portrays 18th-century Williamsburg as it appeared on the eve of the American Revolution. Throughout the city, an engaging mix of sights, sounds , and activities helps guests reconnect with the past and become active participants in 18th-century life, including military life. The Governors Palace, the symbol of British authority in the colony, is the location of military encampments.

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Colonial March

Colonial March

Rachel Cooper

Interpretive characters entertain Colonial Williamsburg visitors with beating drums, trilling fifes, and theatrical programs.

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Randolph House

Randolph House

Rachel Cooper

This original structure was the home of Peyton Randolph, Speaker of the House of Burgesses and president of the first Continental Congress in Philadelphia.

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Windmill

Windmill

Rachel Cooper

During colonial times, windmills were used to grind corn into meal or wheat into flour.

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Duke of Gloucester Street

Duke of Gloucester Street

Rachel Cooper

Duke of Gloucester Street is the main street that runs through the Colonial Williamsburg Historic Area.

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Kings Arm Tavern

Kings Arm Tavern

Rachel Cooper

Kings Arm Tavern is one of the restaurants in the Historic Area of Colonial Williamsburg, offering 18th-century menus served in authentic colonial surroundings.

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Blacksmith

Blacksmith

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

James Anderson was the armorer to the Magazine prior to the Revolution and was public armorer for the duration of the Revolutionary War. The Anderson site highlights James Andersons role in the community as blacksmith, and his government role as armorer before and during the War.

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Brothers in Arms

Brothers in Arms

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

In 18th-century Williamsburg, more than half of the population was African American, either enslaved or free. The struggle to be both free and equal is a theme Colonial Williamsburg explores regularly through its African-American programming. One such program is Brothers-in-Arms where guests explore the compelling stories of thousands of free and enslaved African Americans who were active participants in the War for Independence as soldiers, sailors, camp followers, pioneers, spies, and laborers.

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Cabinetmaker

Cabinet Maker

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Children can experience the art of 18th-century cabinetmaking firsthand in Colonial Williamsburg's Cabinetmaker Shop. Guests of all ages can visit the wareroom where handmade reproductions are on display and then go into the work oom for a demonstration of the craft.

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Courthouse

Courthouse

Rachel Cooper

The courthouse is located in the center of Colonial Williamsburg and serves as a venue for programs about the beginnings of the American justice system.

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Capitol Building

Capitol

Rachel Cooper

From 1699 to 1780 Williamsburg was the capital of Englands oldest, largest, richest and most populous mainland colony and the seat of power in the new nations most influential state. Many of our civil liberties were debated at this colonial seat of government.

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Tailor

Tailor

Rachel Cooper

Tailors during colonial times were skilled at cutting, fitting, and sewing clothes for men and women.

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Horse and Carriage

Photo &copy Rachel Cooper, licensed to About.com, Inc.

Horse and Carriage rides are available daily at Colonial Williamsburg.

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Colonial March 2

Colonial March

Rachel Cooper

Historic interpreters bring history to life at Colonial Williamsburg

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Colonial Home

Colonial Home

Rachel Cooper

The Historic Area of Colonial Williamsburg includes 88 original 18th-century structures and hundreds of houses, shops and public outbuildings that have been reconstructed on their original foundations. Many of the historic homes are rented and occupied by employees of Colonial Williamsburg.

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Duke of Gloucester Street 2

Duke of Gloucester Street

Rachel Cooper

Duke of Gloucester Street is the main street that runs through Colonial Williamsburg.

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Dance

Dance at the Capitol

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

As the capital of colonial Virginia, Williamsburg had a reputation as the cultural center of the colony. At the Capitol, dancers discuss various types of 18th-century dances, from country dances to minuets and demonstrate them for the audience. At various intervals throughout the program, audience members are invited to join in the fun.

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Gunsmith

Gunsmith

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Gunsmiths fashion iron, brass, steel, and wood into firearms. Discover the importance of rifles, fowling pieces, and muskets to the 18th-century community.

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Geddy House - Family Life

Family Life during Colonial Times

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

The Geddy House served as the residence, workshop and shop for silversmith James Geddy Jr. Guests can explore the business and domestic life of the Geddy family.

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Liberty Pole

Liberty Pole

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

In the 18th century, the Liberty Pole, which featured a bag of feathers on one arm and a barrel of tar in the other, deterred colonists from expressing loyalty to the Crown. This was one of a number of events that eventually led Virginians to declare the colonies to be free and become the independent United States of America.

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Wigmaker

Wigmaker

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Kings Arms Barber Shop or Wigmaker catered to some of our nations Founding Fathers, such as Thomas Jefferson, Peyton Randolph, and Patrick Henry. The shop not only provided wigs and other hairpieces but shaves as well. Today journeywomen Betty Myers and Regina Blizzard (left to right) make hairpieces by hand using 18th-century techniques.

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Williamsburg Inn

Williamsburg Inn

Rachel Cooper

The Williamsburg Inn is regarded as one of the worlds best hotels. Amenities include a top-notch restaurant, an outdoor pool, tennis courts, award-winning golf, and a spa and fitness club. The inn is located adjacent to the Historic Area.

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Williamsburg Inn Lobby

Williamsburg Inn Lobby

Rachel Cooper

The Williamsburg Inn is beautifully decorated with original furniture designed specially for the famous hotel. It is a historic country inn with modern facilities.

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Williamsburg Inn Patio

Patio of the Williamsburg Inn

Rachel Cooper

The patio of the Williamsburg Inn overlooks its award-winning golf course.

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