Where is Brooklyn? In What County and City?

Eight Facts About Brooklyn

Empire State Building, Manhattan Bridge and Dumbo
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Question: Where is Brooklyn? In What County and City?

Everyone's heard of Brooklyn, but in what county is Brooklyn located? Find out the basics about Brooklyn, New York. From location to historical facts, there is a lot to discover about Brooklyn.  Brooklyn has been a vital part of American History and is still a place where new trends and innovators flock. The city has seen a tremendous transformation in the past few decades with gentrification and a spike in real estate development, the city is an ever-changing landscape, and should be on your list of must-visit cities.

 

Here's Eight Fun Facts About Brooklyn. I'm sure locals would be stumped by some of these Brooklyn facts.

Answer:

Facts at a Glance about Brooklyn

 

1. Brooklyn New York is part of New York City, which is in New York State. Brooklyn is one of the five boroughs of New York City. It is not the largest NYC borough geographically (the borough of Queens is), but Brooklyn is the most populous New York City borough.(See How many people live in Brooklyn?)

2. Brooklyn is in Kings County. Every borough of New York City is a different county. Brooklyn is known as Kings County for tax and other official purposes. Kings County is Brooklyn, and vice versa; they are one and the same. So, if someone says they are doing business in Kings County, they are doing business in Brooklyn.

3. Sandhogs built the Brooklyn Bridge. Does the word sandhog evoke images of animals that should reside in Sedona? Well, the sandhogs weren't animals at all, but were people.

The term sandhog was a slang word for the workers who built the Brooklyn Bridge. Many of these immigrant workers laid granite and other tasks to complete the Brooklyn Bridge. The bridge was completed in 1883. And who the first person who walked across the bridge? It was Emily Roebling.

4. Brooklyn is not all hipsters. According to the Brooklyn Community Foundation, "Nearly 1 in 4 Brooklyn Residents Lives in Poverty," and the foundation states, "Brooklyn ranks first in NYC in total number of children living in poverty.

Five of the 10 poorest NYC census tracts are in Brooklyn."

5.The Long Island Historical Society was once located in Brooklyn. The Brooklyn Historical Society was originally called the Long Island Historical Society, but changed it's name in the 1950's. There are still signs of the original name in certain details at the Historical Society (um, check the doorknobs when you walk in). Don't miss the Brooklyn Historical Society's Free Fridays which take place the first Friday evening of each month from 5-9pm, except in the summer. 

6. Brooklyn was home to the first African American Major League Baseball Player. When the Brooklyn Dodger's signed Jackie Robinson in April 1947, they would make Major League history. However, this was extremely controversial, and according to History.com, "Some Brooklyn Dodgers players signed a petition against Robinson joining the team." Despite the initial protest, History.com reports that, "Robinson would go on to win the MLB’s 1947 Rookie of the Year award before embarking on an illustrious career as a ball player, television analyst, businessman and civil rights leader."

7. New York City's Oldest Building is in Brooklyn. Brooklyn is home to the Wyckoff House Museum, which is the oldest building in New York City.

The The Wyckoff House & Association, "preserves, interprets, and operates New York City’s oldest building and it’s surrounding 1.5 acres of farmland." You can visit the home and tour the property located in Canarsie. 

8. Brooklyn Isn't A City. Even though Brooklyn is larger than many cities, Brooklyn isn't a city. It's an outer-borough of New York City. At one time, Brooklyn was it's own city, but that was back in the 1800's. It's now apart of New York City. Next time you're visiting the Big Apple, walk across the Brooklyn Bridge and think of the Sandhogs as you make the famous walk across the bridge, like Emily Roebling. Once you step off the bridge, start exploring!

 

Edited by

Alison Lowenstein