How to Travel from Seville to Ronda by Train, Bus, and Car

A mountain view of Ronda
Leo Hidalgo / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

From Seville, the mountaintop village of Ronda is 83 miles (133 kilometers) away. In the region of Andalusia, it is technically closer to the city of Malaga with 63 miles (102 kilometers) between them and is a popular pit stop on the route from Seville to Malaga. Ronda is not the easiest place to get to because the region is quite remote and mountainous and train routes are not direct.

The most direct way to get to Ronda on your own is by renting a car and driving. It's possible to take the bus or train, but a car will allow you more freedom to explore the region's parks and maybe drive onto nearby Gibraltar.

On the other hand, Ronda also makes a convenient stop along the way from Seville to both Malaga or Granada if you just want to see the city for a few hours. Tour buses running between these three cities often pause for extended layovers in Ronda, but working out what to do with your bags, as well as fitting in all the destinations you want to see in a few hours, is a lot to attempt if you've never been to the region.

The easiest way to experience Ronda is to take a guided tour, which will whisk you there and back and give you an expert's insight into the region. Although very few tour companies offer guided trips exclusively between Seville and Ronda, there are some that do multi-day tours of southern Spain that include both Seville and Ronda. The roads can also be difficult to navigate, but if you're determined to visit Ronda solo rather than with a guide or as a part of a tour, there are a number of ways to travel to Ronda from Seville.

How to Get from Seville to Ronda
  Time Cost
Train 2 hours, 45 minutes from $50
Bus 2 hours from $15
Car 1 hour, 45 minutes 83 miles (133 kilometers)

By Train

It's possible to book a ticket with Renfe, Spain's state-owned rail operator, from Seville to Ronda, but there is no direct service. You will have to first travel to Cordoba on a nonstop high-speed train and then transfer to the Altaria train toward Algeciras. The second train is slower and also makes stops in the towns of Puente Genil and Antequera. If you're interested in getting off along the way, Antequera is another popular day trip destination from Seville famous for Dolmen de Menga, a prehistoric structure similar to England's Stonehenge. However, double-check the train schedules before getting off, since there might not be another train to Ronda for that day.

It's not a well-trafficked route, so there is usually only one train departure per day and you should expect to arrive in Ronda in the late afternoon. As a result, staying overnight in Ronda is a good way to get the most out of your time in the city. You can start your day sightseeing before other tourists arrive, giving you access to some of the most popular destinations without having to wait in lines or avoid people to get good photos of your trip.

By Bus

Spanish bus companies InterBus, Damas (formerly Los Amarillos), and Movelia both run direct routes to Ronda from Seville. The journey takes between two and three hours. The bus leaves from the Prado de San Sebastian Bus Station and arrives at the Ronda Central Bus Station, a short walk from the town center. From Ronda, you can also travel to Malaga, Marbella, Cadiz, Algeciras, and Fuengirola by bus. Tickets for the bus also tend to be much cheaper than taking the train.

By Car

If you want to have the most flexibility with your schedule and itinerary and don't mind a little extra expense on your trip, renting a car is the best way to access the remote parts of the country like Ronda. To reach Ronda from Seville, take the A-376, followed by a short section of the A382 before returning to the A-376. You will eventually see Ronda signposted, and the journey takes just under two hours.

Driving to Ronda will also give you an advantage if you leave early in the morning. The city fills up with tourists around midday when the buses begin to roll in. If you get an early start, you may be able to beat the crowds.

Remember when renting a car in Spain, you will need to obtain an International Driver's Permit (IDP) before you depart for your journey. Although several car rental companies may accept your domestic state driver's license, police officers in Spain may issue tickets, confiscate your rental, or even put you in jail for driving without proper documentation.

What to See in Ronda

This mountaintop city in the southern region of Malaga is located atop the El Tajo gorge and offers visitors a wide range of sightseeing opportunities, outdoor activities, and year-round events. Established under a Moorish rule in the first century and rebuilt in the 15th century, Ronda is a great destination for breathtaking views, historic architecture, and rich cultural heritage. Among Ronda's most interesting sights are the Puente Nuevo Bridge, Arab Baths, Mondragon Palace, Cuenca Gardens, and a bullfighting ring.

Ronda is most often visited as a day trip from Seville or any of the other major Andalusian cities, which involves five hours of bus travel (or four hours of driving) back and forth, leaving guests with limited time to explore all that the city has to offer. However, you can still make a decent day trip out of the adventure if you hop on a one-day wine-tasting, bullfighting, or Pueblos Blancos tour, all of which include stops in Ronda.

Because most tourists simply pass through the city on their way to Seville or Malaga during the daytime, Ronda becomes a completely different place at night. This doesn't mean Ronda becomes a ghost town when the sun goes down, though; the city has a very vibrant tapas culture with some great places to eat with the locals.

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