How to Travel From London to Norwich by Train, Bus, and Car

Canal Amidst Buildings In Town Against Sky
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In the northern corner of East Anglia, Norwich provides Londoners, and visitors to London, a quiet retreat destination. This small city on the River Wensum offers an alternative experience to the busy city with its charming cobblestone streets, historic buildings, a quirky arts scene, and plenty of beaches. From London, Norwich is 118 miles (190 kilometers) away and you can easily get there by train or bus. Although Norwich does have its own international airport, there are no direct flights between the two cities. Driving may be too expensive if you're just looking for a short day trip, but if you have the time and budget to spare, renting a car is a fun way to explore the beaches of Suffolk and Norfolk on your way to Norwich.

  Time Cost Best For
Train 2 hours from $60 Fast and convenient
Bus 3 hours, 20 minutes from $9 Budget travel
Car 2 hours, 30 minutes 118 miles (190 kilometers) Flexibility

What Is the Cheapest Way to Get From London to Norwich?

National Express runs a regular bus service between London Victoria Coach Station and the Norwich Bus Station, which leaves London at least three times per day. The journey takes about three hours, 20 minutes, but it could take up to four hours if the bus stops at Stansted Airport. Tickets prices are very consistent at $9 one-way, although you may see a bump during the holidays or any other busy travel time. You can either book your ticket at the bus station or on the National Express website.

What Is the Fastest Way to Get From London to Norwich?

Greater Anglia Trains leave for Norwich Station from London Liverpool Street every hour. The train journey takes just two hours, which makes it faster than driving by half an hour. It's also faster because you won't have to deal with any traffic or other delays. One way train tickets typically cost between $60 and $90.

How Long Does It Take to Drive?

It takes at least two hours, 30 minutes to drive the 118 miles (190 kilometers) that separate London and Norwich. Heading east from London via the A13, you can get on the M11 and take this road north until you see the option to merge onto the A11. Then, stay on this road and follow it east all the way to Norwich.

Traffic going east out of London toward the M11 can be very heavy throughout the day, so much so that it can add several hours each way to your driving time. If you can manage an early start, you'll run into less traffic by leaving London before 5 a.m.

When Is the Best Time to Travel to Norwich?

The best season to visit Norwich, and any other part of Norfolk, is in the summer when the weather is at its most pleasant. Although it's near the coast, this region is still very temperate and not excluded from the UK's characteristic dampness. Norwich is a pretty quiet town, but there are some notable events to look out for throughout the year, such as a kid-friendly video game festival in May and the Sundown Music Festival in September, which often draws big acts.

What's the Most Scenic Route to Norwich?

If you've got the time to spare, you can turn your trip to Norwich into a tour of Suffolk and Norfolk. This part of England is known for its fairytale-like villages and quiet beachside towns. Suffolk, in particular, is known for attracting artists, so you might come across some interesting craft shops, galleries, and public art installations along the way, such as the larger-than-life scallop sculpture on Aldeburgh Beach.

The most scenic way to make this trip is to follow the coast. Instead of heading north on the M11, keep going east on the A12 and you'll be able to follow this road all the way up the coast and can hop on and off wherever you like. When you're ready to continue on to Norwich, you can drive northwest on the A146, which will bring you all the rest of the way into Norwich

What Is There to Do in Norwich?

A university city with a medieval quarter and a 1,000-year-old cathedral, Norwich has one of the largest daily markets in Britain, a lively art scene, and great riverside walks. Norwich owes it charm to the fact that it was overlooked during the UK's industrial period, so it still retains much of its old-world charm. In addition to the cathedral, history-seekers should also pay a visit to the 900-year-old Norwich Castle, the Dragon Hall, which was used by traders in the middle ages, and the lovely Plantation Gardens. If you're looking for something more contemporary to do, the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts is a high-tech museum where you can peruse modern art exhibitions and take a long stroll around the 350-acre outdoor sculpture park.

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