6 Favorite Swedish Foods

Swedish shrimp in window
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When we think of Swedish food we often think of Swedish meatballs. Indeed, meatballs are one of the best culinary items available in Sweden, but there are many other delicious foods that originate here. So when you visit here, make sure to try a few of these delicious Sweden foods or you'll definitely be missing out.

  • 01 of 06

    Köttbullar (Swedish Meatballs)

    Traditional Swedish dish of meatballs, Old Town Square, Gamla Stan, Stockholm, Sweden, Scandinavia, Europe
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    Meatballs are the national dish of Sweden and they are definitely a must-try Swedish food for any tourist. You can find them at practically any restaurant in Sweden and also at food trucks. Swedish meatballs are made with fresh ingredients including ground meat, finely chopped onions, and spices and then dipped in breadcrumbs. There's also a Christmas version of meatballs called julköttbullar. Traditionally they are served with cucumbers, potatoes, gravy, and jam. 

  • 02 of 06

    Smörgåstårta (Sandwich Cake)

    Smörgåstårta
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    As the name suggests, smörgåstårta is a cross between a cake and a sandwich. It is fresh-baked bread in the form of a cake that's full of vegetables, meats, and fish. The "icing" on the cake is generally cream cheese and sour cream and is usually decorated with various vegetables and fruits. It's served cold and cut like a dessert. This is a popular dish for family get-togethers, parties, and brunches in Sweden.

  • 03 of 06

    Spettekaka (Spit Cake)

    Sweden, Skane, Close up of Spettekaka cake, people in background
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    This Swedish food is a unique cake that takes hours to make and is popular in the province of Scania. These cakes are made by piping ribbons of batter onto a rotating spit. The batter is made mainly from eggs, sugar, and potato starch flour. There are many layers of batter on each cake, and after each layer, the batter must be left to completely dry before the next layer can be applied, so it can take days to complete this cake. Once all layers are dry, the cake is drizzled with icing. The end result can be quite dry because of the lengthy cooking process, so the cakes are usually wrapped tightly in plastic and only unwrapped immediately before they are to be eaten. It is commonly served at weddings, christenings, and funerals.

    Spettekaka is an official regional specialty and can only be made in Scania (just as champagne can only come from France's Champagne region). So to try this unique dessert, you will have to visit a bakery in Scania.

  • 04 of 06

    Kanelbullar (Cinnamon Rolls)

    Swedish Cinnamon buns or rolls (Kanelbullar), freshly baked from the oven.
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    Believe it or not, cinnamon rolls actually originated in Sweden, and they the Swedes love them so much that they have a national Kanelbullar Day every October 4. These delicious pastries, which originated around 1920, can be found at any bakery or café in Sweden and are usually served with coffee.

    Continue to 5 of 6 below.
  • 05 of 06

    Räkor (Swedish Shrimp)

    Swedish shrimp in window
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    The shrimp in Stockholm are world famous and a must-try for anyone traveling to Sweden. They are cooked inside the shell, which gives them a crunchy consistency. Räkor, also called cariedas, has a different taste than any other shrimp and are available at most restaurants in Sweden.

  • 06 of 06

    Princesstårta (Princess Cake)

    A piece of Princess cake, Sweden
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    This traditional Swedish cake is made of layers of sponge cake and whipped cream. It is topped with green marzipan and usually has an edible pink marzipan rose on top. Nearly every bakery in Sweden will have Princess cake. It is also commercially made and available at supermarkets but, like most other treats, it is best to get it from a bakery.