Top 10 Historical Attractions in Texas

Texas has a long and interesting history. Luckily, many of Texas' most historic sites and landmarks remain and are available for tours and viewing for visitors.

  • 01 of 10
    The Alamo, San Antonio, Texas, America
    Joe Daniel Price / Getty Images

    The site of one of the most notorious battles in history has been remarkably preserved and is open to tourists. Visitors to the Alamo are able to stand in the very spot some of the famous Texas defenders stood during the historic siege of the Alamo. Not surprisingly, the Alamo is one of the most visited attractions in Texas and is considered a "must-see" for anyone staying in the San Antonio area while visiting the Lone Star State.

  • 02 of 10
    Low Angle View Of Texas State Capitol Building Against Sky
    Robert Rowe / EyeEm / Getty Images

    Completed in 1888, the Texas Capitol was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1986. Today it is open to visitors on a daily basis. Touring the Capitol building allows visitors to get an up-close look at where the laws governing Texas are crafted and have been for more than 100 years. The Capitol is also decorated with a number of pieces of historical artwork. Also on the Capitol grounds is the old General Land Office, itself site of many historical achievements in Texas history. 

  • 03 of 10
    San Jacinto Monument at San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site.
    Stephen Saks / Getty Images

    One of the most revered sites in Texas history is the San Jacinto Battleground—the very place where Texas gained its independence. Today, the San Jacinto Monument and Museum sit atop the plot of ground where Gen. Sam Houston defeated the army of Gen. Santa Anna.

  • 04 of 10
    Waco, Texas, USA - Aug 4, 2017: The view from Emmons Cliff overlooking the Brazos River and Texas Hill Country beyond.
    Steven Autry / Getty Images

    Washington-on-the-Brazos is the location where the Convention of 1836 signed Texas' Declaration of Independence from Mexico. The site also served as the Texas Capitol off and on through the early years of the Republic of Texas.

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  • 05 of 10
    Port Isabel Lighthouse Museum
    Richard Cummins / Getty Images

    Located in Port Isabel, one of the oldest towns in Texas, the Point Isabel Lighthouse served mariners along the Lower Texas Coast throughout the Civil War and into the 1900s. Today the Lighthouse and surrounding grounds are part of the Texas State Park system. Visitors are allowed to climb the spiraling stairs to the top of the Lighthouse, where they are treated to a spectacular view of South Padre Island, Port Isabel and the Lower Laguna Madre bay.

  • 06 of 10
    Battleship Texas State Historic Site
    Purdue9394 / Getty Images

    A veteran of both World Wars, the Battleship Texas is now moored at the San Jacinto Historical Site, where it is open for tours to the public. The Battleship Texas is a popular stop for both individual tourists as well as groups such as Boy Scouts, Girls Scouts, and school groups.

  • 07 of 10

    San Antonio Missions

    Mission San Jose: an Unesco Site
    Gabriel Perez / Getty Images

    Missions San Jose, San Juan, Espada, and Concepcion were built over the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. Today these four historic San Antonio landmarks have been preserved and are open to the public as part of the San Antonio Missions National Historical Park.

  • 08 of 10
    View Of City At Sunset
    Galveston, Texas. James Kolbert / EyeEm / Getty Images

    Completed in 1893, the Bishop's Palace survived the 1900 hurricane and is now part of Galveston's Historic Homes Tour. Visitors to the Bishop's Palace are able to get a feel for life in turn-of-the-century Galveston.

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  • 09 of 10
    Giant Live Oak on Cemetery in Houston Texas
    © Allard Schager / Getty Images

    The Texas State Cemetery was established in 1851 and is the final resting ground for such Texas icons as Stephen F. Austin, General Albert Sidney Johnston, Governor Allan Shivers, Governor John Connally, and Lieutenant Governor Bob Bullock.

  • 10 of 10
    Detail from the Moody Mansion, a house museum in Galveston, Texas
    Buyenlarge / Getty Images

    Completed in 1895, the Moody Mansion is the epitome of Victorian architecture in turn of the century Galveston. The mansion, which was home to the powerful Moody family, survived the 1900 hurricane and now has been restored and is open for tours and lunch.