7 Strangely Appropriate Places to Escape President Trump

Seven weird alternatives to living under America's least popular president-elect

Like him or not, Donald Trump has just become the President-elect of the United States. Emphasis on the "or not" contingent: Trump was the most-disliked presidential nominee in U.S. history, second only to the opponent he beat. 

Trump will take office on January 20, 2017, which has some of the Americans who neither like him nor voted for him searching for plane tickets. Whether you want to take an inauguration vacation, or ride out entire four (or, heaven forbid, eight) years of Trump's presidency abroad, here are seven strange (and strangely appropriate) places to escape America's strangest president.

  • 01 of 07

    The (Actual) Other Side of the World

    Pink-Lake.jpg
    The water of Australia's pink lake might look like Pepto Bismol, but you shouldn't drink it to calm your Trump-stomach. Flickr user graeme (via Creative Commons)

    According to FurthestCity.com, Perth, Australia is literally as far as you can be from Washington D.C. and still be on dry land. Perth is pretty strange itself, being the world's most isolated metropolitan area, but surrounding Western Australia happens to be home to some very weird places as well—namely, a lake the color of the Pepto Bismol you've probably taken in the wake of Trump's election.

    Australia itself, of course, is the proverbial poster girl of weird destinations, home to super-sized spiders, snakes and crocodiles, marsupials and the world's largest rock.

  • 02 of 07

    Where the Blue Fire Still Burns

    Kawah-Ijen-4.JPG
    Kawah Ijen's abundant sulfur deposits cause it to emit fluorescent blue flames. Robert Schrader

    The punditocracy (the same punditocracy, incidentally, who got the election so incredibly wrong) has declared the Democratic Party itself dead, a pile of rubble centered around but not limited to the corpse of Hillary Clinton's campaign. Where, oh where, in the world do blue fires still burn?

    Well, if you ask this question literally, the obvious answer is Kawah Ijen. A volcano located across the water from Bali, at the eastern tip of Indonesia's Java Island, Kawah Ijen requires a moonlit, hours-long hike and descending inside the crater of an active volcano in the middle of the night, gas mask on face.

    Going there, to be sure, is more likely to make you dizzy than motivate you to be more active in the 2018 or 2020 elections. But if you're true blue in your heart, there's no other place in the world where your color burns more brightly. 

  • 03 of 07

    (Another) Hell on Earth

    Dallol
    The author in Dallol. Robert Schrader

    Speaking of volcanos, another impressive one is Erta Ale, located in Ethiopia's Danakil Depression, a.k.a. the door to hell. One reason for this moniker is the visual image of the volcano, which is home to one of Earth's only persistent lava lakes.

    Another reason is that a nearby ghost town called Dallol is the hottest inhabited place on the planet, and sits in close proximity to a yellow sulfur field that seems more like Venus than Earth. 

    The moral of the story RE: visiting Dallol? If you think Trump's America will be Hell on Earth, you might want to visit the Earth's literal answer to hell for comparison's sake.

  • 04 of 07

    Brazil's Parched Pits of Despair

    Lençóis Maranhenses
    Brazil's Lençóis Maranhenses is not just hidden – water only exists there a few months per year!. Robert Schrader

    Moving right along in hopelessness, Brazil's Lençóis Maranhenses is a veritable pit of despair—or at least it will be, around the time of Trump's inauguration. That's because January is the dry season in this part of Brazil, and the spaces between the massive sand dunes here are not filled with lagoons, as they are during the rainy season. The biggest irony of the Lençóis, no matter when you visit, is that such a parched place sits roughly equidistance from both the lush Amazon and the cooling breezes of the Atlantic Ocean, a proximity to paradise that mirrors how close Hillary Clinton was to the presidency.

    Continue to 5 of 7 below.
  • 05 of 07

    (Sort of) at Putin's Doorstep

    Oymyakon Forests
    Oymyakon, Russia is the coldest place on Earth. Maarten Takens via Wikimedia Commons

    Moscow is an amazing city, but it's difficult to argue that it's weird, the colorful domes of St. Basil's Cathedral, perhaps, notwithstanding. On the other hand, Russia is home both to the coldest place on Earth as well as a lake with frozen waves—these places count for something, right?

    Since Vladimir Putin may well have handed Donald Trump the Presidency, wouldn't it be strangely appropriate to spend the inauguration on his soil? You might even be able to hear the incoming president's inaugural address translated back into the native Russian in which it was written.

  • 06 of 07

    Earth's Least Misogynistic Country

    Ice Beach Iceland
    This beach in Iceland might be the only thing colder than the temperature of a woman's heart when she thinks of Donald Trump. Robert Schrader

    Nobody loves women more than Donald Trump—according to nobody other than Donald Trump. One fact substantiated by numbers, however, is that Iceland is the world's least misogynistic country, at least according to the World Economic Forum's 2015 Gender Gap Survey

    Among the weird destinations that serve as a backdrop for this utopia of gender equality? A beach covered by ice, not to mention dozens of waterfalls, volcanoes and a magnificent church built in spite of Iceland's status as one of the world's least religious countries.

  • 07 of 07

    A Japanese Island With Lots of Cats to Grab

    Tashirojima, Japan
    Japan's Tashirojima Island is full of cats just waiting to be grabbed. Robert Schrader

    One reason, logically speaking, so many people are dog people is that cats simply don't like to be grabbed. Conversely, if you're someone who pets cats whether they like it or not, the Japanese Island of Tashirojima might be a great place to ride out the presidency of every cat's worst-nightmare owner.

    A sad fact about Tashirojima is that, in order to access it, you'll need to board a ferry in Ishinomaki, a town that was all but destroyed by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. The silver lining of this, of course, is that it puts the recent election into perspective and, if you do decide to set foot on U.S. soil again before January 20, 2021, will serve as a reminder that your world has not actually ended.

    (Unless, of course, something happens between now and then that causes and apocalypse—God help us all!)