Photos of Stalin's Seven Sisters in Moscow

  • 01 of 11

    Moscow State University - Main Building Exemplifies Stalinist Architecture

    Moscow State University Building
    ••• Moscow State University Building. iStockphoto/Dontsov

    "Stalin's Seven Sisters" is the nickname given to a group of skyscrapers built in the Stalinist style of architecture, which is also known as a "wedding cake" style because of the skyscrapers' tiered construction. Russia's Seven Sisters reside in Moscow. Buildings in other countries formerly belonging to the Soviet Union also exemplify the style Stalin's Seven Sisters are famous for.

    The main building of the Moscow State University, probably the most recognizable of the Seven Sisters, was completed in 1953 and construction was undertaken with the labor of prisoners of the Soviet Gulag, or labor camp system. This building can be found on Sparrow Hills.

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  • 02 of 11

    Moscow's Hotel Ukraina

    Hotel Ukraina Moscow
    ••• Hotel Ukraina Moscow. iStockphoto/Cay-Uwe

    Hotel Ukraina (pronounced oo-kray-EEN-ah), now the Radisson  Royal, is famous for its longtime standing as one of Europe's tallest hotels (it is no longer the tallest). This Stalin's Sister is located near Moscow's city center on Kutozovsky Prospect. The hotel's construction was completed in 1955, but it has since had a facelift.

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  • 03 of 11

    Moscow's Ministry of Foreign Affairs Building

    Ministry of Foreign Affairs Moscow
    ••• Ministry of Foreign Affairs Moscow. iStockphoto/Mordolff

    Located on Smolenskaya-Sennaya Square in the Arbat district of Moscow, this member of Stalin's Seven Sisters houses the offices of Russia's Ministery of Foreign Affairs. Construction for this building ended in 1953.

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  • 04 of 11

    Moscow's Leningradskaya Hotel

    Leningradskaya Hotel Moscow
    ••• Leningradskaya Hotel Moscow. iStockphoto/mikule

    Hotel Leningradskaya, on Komsomolskaya Square, is now run by Hilton Hotels. The hotel, built in 1953, and meant to symbolize opulence, boasts modern conveniences after a thorough renovation and a location that allows for easy access to Moscow's sights.

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  • 05 of 11

    Kotelnicheskaya Embankment Building

    Stalinist Building on Kotelnicheskaya Embankment
    ••• Stalinist Building on Kotelnicheskaya Embankment. iStockphoto/rest

    The Kotelnicheskaya Embankment Building can be found looming over the Moskva River. Completed in 1952, this member of Stalin's Seven Sisters was built to house communal flats for Moscow's citizens, many of them historically notable.

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  • 06 of 11

    Kudrinskaya Square Building

    Stalinist Building on Kudrinksaya Square
    ••• Stalinist Building on Kudrinksaya Square. iStockphoto/Mordolff
    This Stalinist structure from 1954 faces Moscow's Garden Ring and was built to house apartments for the Soviet elite.
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  • 07 of 11

    Red Gates Square Building

    Dushkin's Red Gates Building
    ••• Dushkin's Red Gates Building. iStockphoto/nordamon
    The Red Gates Square Building, built by the architect Alexander Dushkin and completed in 1953, houses administrative offices and apartments. It is also located on the Garden Ring.
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  • 08 of 11

    Riga's Academy of Sciences Building

    Riga Academy of Sciences
    ••• Riga Academy of Sciences. iStockphoto/typo-graphics
    Latvia's Academy of Sciences, located in Riga, while not officially one of the "Seven Sisters," is built in the Stalinist skyscraper style and was completed during the same era in 1956.
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  • 09 of 11

    Warsaw Palace of Science and Culture

    Warsaw's Palace of Science and Culture
    ••• Warsaw's Palace of Science and Culture. iStockphoto/tsz01

    Warsaw's Palace of Science and Culture was a gift to Poland from the Soviet Union and completed in 1955. Like Riga's Academy of Sciences, it is not officially one of the Sisters, but it exemplifies the characteristics found in other Stalinist skyscrapers. Warsaw's residents continue to debate whether it has a place on their city's skyline: on one hand it represents the oppressiveness of Moscow's influence, and on the other, it is a piece of history that serves as  important monument.

    More about the Palace of Culture and Science.

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  • 10 of 11

    Casa Presei Libere in Bucharest

    Casa Presei Libere
    ••• Casa Presei Libere. CC BY Gabriel

    The House of the Free Press, as Casa Presei Libere is known in English, was built in 1956. Once housing the headquarters of a Romanian Communist newspaper, the building continues to host the offices of newspapers.
     

     

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  • 11 of 11

    Hotel Ukrayina in Kiev

    Hotel Ukrayina
    ••• Hotel Ukrayina. CC BY ReallyAlexPro

    Hotel Ukrayina, located in Kiev, was originally named Hotel Moscow. This example of Stalinist-style architecture is a paired-down version of the more monumental structures in Moscow, Riga, and Warsaw. Due to long delays with construction as well as the winding down for the trend for "wedding cake" architecture, the hotel lacks the tower and spire that are representative of the other buildings belonging stylistically to this group.