Grave Sites of Famous People in the Pacific Northwest

Chief Seattle Grave Site in Suquamish, Washington
Chief Seattle Grave Site in Suquamish, Washington. Angela M. Brown

Would you like to pay your final respects at the grave sites of the Pacific Northwest's distinguished citizens? Leave a token to honor such folks as Jimi Hendrix or Bruce Lee? Taking the time to stop at the grave sites of one of the Northwest's notable citizens is something that both visitors and natives find worthwhile. Here are the locations and details regarding the final resting place of these famous Northwesterners:

Steve Prefontaine
Coos Bay, Oregon is the site of a memorial to Steve Prefontaine. A record-setting middle- and long-distance runner, Prefontaine was also known and respected for his activism. He died in a car accident at age 24.

Henry Weinhard
Another Oregon notable is Henry Weinhard, a nineteenth-century brewer whose beverage legacy survives even today. His 1904 grave site can be visited at the Riverview Cemetery in Portland. One more historic figure resting in this cemetery is Virgil Earp, the peacekeeper of the Old West. Virgil Earp was buried in 1905.

Bruce Lee, Brandon Lee, and Seattle's Founding Citizens
Lake View Cemetery in Seattle is the final resting place for a number of well-known Northwest pioneers. This list of Seattle's founding citizens includes Hiram M. Chittendon, Arthur A. Denny, "Doc" Maynard, Thomas Mercer, John and Hilda Nordstrom, and Henry L. Yesler. Lake View Cemetery is also home to the grave sites of Bruce Lee and Brandon Lee. The father and son martial artists/actors lie side by side.​

Jimi Hendrix
Jimi Hendrix's grave has become a significant visitor destination. Devoted fans leave mementos of all kinds at his simple grave site in Renton's Greenwood Memorial Park. Perhaps the most lavish memorial of all time, Experience Music Project, Seattle's new interactive music museum, is a showcase for billionaire Paul Allen's extensive collection of Hendrix memorabilia and other rock 'n' roll artifacts.

Chief Seattle
Suquamish's Saint Peter's Churchyard is home to a striking memorial to Chief Seattle (Noah Sealth), whose eloquent speech regarding man's relationship with the Earth is still remembered and repeated today. It was "Doc" Maynard who made the decision to name the city after Chief Seattle.