National Law Enforcement Museum in Washington DC

NLEMM
••• National Law Enforcement Memorial Museum. Photo © National Law Enforcement Memorial Fund

The National Law Enforcement Museum is an initiative of a private non-profit organization, the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, to tell the history of American law enforcement. The organization is raising money to build a 55,000 square foot, mostly underground museum that will be located adjacent to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, DC. The Museum will be a natural extension of the memorial and will include high-tech, interactive exhibits, collections, research, and education programs.

Visitors will be "an officer for the day" and get to experience first-hand the situations law enforcers often face, from split-second decisions involved when apprehending a suspect to mastering basic forensic techniques. 

Although a ceremonial groundbreaking took place in 2010, construction began in February 2016. Architect and Planner Davis Buckley has been selected to design and build the museum. It will be a unique and modern architectural structure designed as an energy-efficient LEED-certified building. The opening date is projected for mid-2018.

When completed, the National Law Enforcement Museum will include a vast collection of historic artifacts and dedicated spaces for research and education. Educational programs will be available for school-age children, families, adults and law enforcement professionals. A Hall of Remembrance will honor more than 19,000 law enforcement officers whose names are inscribed on the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial.

Sample Artifacts

  • From J. Edgar Hoover's Estate - more than 2,000 items. These include his office desk, chair, and telephone, presentation items, awards, photographs, correspondence, books, recordings of Mr. Hoover's speeches and numerous other items that relate to his personal and professional life, specifically his tenure as director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) from 1924 to 1972.
  • Women in Law Enforcement Timeline - Visitors will follow the evolution of women in law enforcement from the mid 19th century to present day.
  • Law Enforcement and Pop Culture - Pop culture artifacts include items such as a Dragnet Toy Set, a CHIPS Action Figure on Radio Control Motorcycle, a suit jacket and tie from the TV show Hawaii Five-O, a Lone Ranger Comic Magazine, a Mod Squad Trading Card and more.
  • The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is lending the Museum a number of historically significant items, including the .38-caliber, top break, 5 shot, pearl-handled handgun used by mobster Al Capone, as well as the Victor .32-caliber 5 shot of IRS Agent Michael Malone, who led the investigation that brought Capone to justice in 1931. In addition, the IRS is lending the Museum a number of historical badges worn by its agents involved in prohibition, narcotics, intelligence and other enforcement functions.
  • The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) is lending the Museum the motorcycle used for over three decades by Undercover ATF agents while investigating the worst of the worst criminals across this country. From 1997 to 1999 ATF Agent Blake Boteler used the motorcycle to infiltrate the Sons of Silence outlaw motorcycle organization which ultimately led to the arrest of over 85 members and associates on weapons charges and drug trafficking charges in Colorado.

    Location

    Judiciary Square, 400 block of E Street, NW Washington, DC. The museum will be built near the Judiciary Square Metro station. See a map of Penn Quarter

    About Davis Buckley Architects and Planners

    Davis Buckley Architects and Planners designs new buildings, urban design and adaptive re-use projects integrating historic and modern program elements, including museums, interpretive and commemorative programs, and sites. Other projects in Washington DC include the Stephen Decatur House Museum, Kennedy Kreiger School, Woodlawn, The Watergate Hotel and more. For more information, visit www.davisbuckley.com.

    Website: www.nleomf.org/museum