Little Venice to Camden

  • 01 of 08

    Little Venice

    Tourists photograph The Ilkeston, a restored narrow boat, as it is towed on Regent's Canal.
    ••• Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

    Walking beside the Regent's Canal in London from Little Venice to Camden is a wonderful way to pass a few hours. The route passes beautiful houseboats at Little Venice, Nash Regency houses and London Zoo before reaching Camden Lock. I hope these photos inspire you to try the walk. 

    If you enjoy London's waterways, you may well enjoy a visit to the London Canal Museum.

    Little Venice was named by the poet Robert Browning who lived overlooking the canal in the 1800s.

    Start from Warwick Avenue tube station and you'll be at Little Venice, named by the poet Robert Browning who lived overlooking the canal in the 1800s. It's very picturesque here so do stop and take photos and maybe visit the Waterside Cafe before starting the walk. You want to be on the opposite side to the cafe to walk to Camden.

    Little Venice to Camden Walk

    Waterscape (British Waterways) have many canal-side walks and these photos are a part of this Little Venice to Camden Circular Walk. I chose to stop at Camden...MORE and not return to Little Venice. It's not a strenuous walk, it takes 1-2 hours, and my four year old managed it with minimal complaints. Be aware there might be diversions along the route but there are always directions posted so you won't get lost.

    Continue to 2 of 8 below.
  • 02 of 08

    Waterside Cafe, Little Venice

    Waterside Cafe in Little Venice
    ••• Frans Sellies/Getty Images

    Little Venice was named by the poet Robert Browning who lived overlooking the canal in the 1800s. 

    Start from Warwick Avenue tube station and you'll be at Little Venice, named by the poet Robert Browning who lived overlooking the canal in the 1800s. It's very picturesque here so do stop and take photos and maybe visit the Waterside Cafe before starting the walk. You want to be on the opposite side to the cafe to walk to Camden.

    Continue to 3 of 8 below.
  • 03 of 08

    Cafe Laville

    Cafe Laville
    ••• Google/cc

    Cafe Laville is a short walk from Little Venice and is right over the Regent's Canal so offers great views from inside.

    Cafe Laville is a popular place to stop, near Little Venice as it has the wonderful location right over the Canal. They serve meals but I usually stop for a cup of tea and enjoy the view.

    Cafe Laville, 453 Edgware Rd, London W2 1TH Tel: 020 7706 2620

    Continue to 4 of 8 below.
  • 04 of 08

    Nash Regency House

    Park Crescent is at the north end of Portland Place in London
    ••• Mike Kemp/Getty Images

    These Regency houses, designed by Robert Nash, can be seen on a walk from Little Venice to Camden.

    These homes were for London's wealthy elite - a world away from the lives of the navvies and boaters who worked the canals.

    Continue to 5 of 8 below.
  • 05 of 08

    Regent's Canal

    London - Evening light under arailway bridge over Regents Canal in Hackney
    ••• Mike Kemp/Getty Images

    Along with this walk, you'll often get to see narrowboats on the water. If you enjoy London's waterways, you may well enjoy a visit to the London Canal Museum.

    Continue to 6 of 8 below.
  • 06 of 08

    Blow Up Bridge

    The Macclesfield Bridge
    ••• Jim Linwood/Flickr/cc 2.0

    Macclesfield Bridge is more commonly known as 'Blow up Bridge'.

    Information from British Waterways:

    At ​3 a.m. on 2 October 1874, the boat Tilbury, carrying gunpowder to a quarry in the Midlands, exploded, demolishing the bridge and killing three people. Locals sprang from their beds, fearing an earthquake.

    When the bridge was rebuilt, they turned the pillars around so that they offered a smooth surface for boats' towing ropes, look out for the rope grooves on both sides of the pillars.

    Continue to 7 of 8 below.
  • 07 of 08

    Feng Shang Floating Restaurant

    Feng Shang Floating Restaurant
    ••• Google/CC

    The Feng Shang Restaurant was built back in the 1980s and was the first floating restaurant in London. Find out more about the walk below...

    The Feng Shang was built back in the 1980s and was the first floating restaurant in London. It is a popular location and a beautiful setting in the Cumberland Basin. It has undergone refurbishment and the menu now has a Japanese section.

    Continue to 8 of 8 below.
  • 08 of 08

    Camden Lock

    Landmark sign (circa 1970's) with trompe l'oeil painters, on railway bridge over Chalk Farm Road.
    ••• George Rex/Flickr/CC 2.0

    Camden Lock is a great place to leave the canal and shop or dine at Camden Markets. Find out more about the walk below...

    Look out for London Street Art in this area.