Civic Center Walking Tour in Denver

  • 01 of 07

    Byers-Evans House Museum:1310 Bannock St.

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    ••• flickr/Wally Gobetz

    Start your tour by driving to the corner of 13th Ave. and Bannock St. Park at one of the surface lots or parking meters along Bannock St.

    The Byers-Evans House, built in 1883, stands as one of Denver's grandest historical homes. Built by newspaper magnate Williams Byers, the home was purchased six years later by William Evans. The brick Italianate home has a magnificent library where poetry readings and events are occasionally held.

    Guided tours are offered Mon-Saturday from 10:30 am - 2:30 pm and Sunday from 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm. The gallery at the Byers-Evans House, which displays artwork with a Western theme, is open Monday-Saturday from 10 am - 4 pm and Sunday from 1 pm - 4 pm. Admission to the gallery is free, but admission prices to the guided tours are listed below. Call 303-620-4933 for more information.

    Members: Free
    Adults: $6
    Seniors (65+): $5
    Students with ID: $5
    Children (6-12): $4
    Children (under 6): Free

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  • 02 of 07

    Denver Art Museum: 13th Ave. Between Bannock and Broadway

    The Frederic C. Hamilton Building, part of The Denver Art Museum in Denver, Colorado. The museum has collections of architecture, design & graphics; Asian art; modern and contemporary art, Native American art, and photography. The Hamilton Building was designed by the architect Daniel Libeskind and opened to the public in 2006
    ••• James Leynse/Corbis/Getty Images

    Continue east on 13th Ave. for half a block until you see the Denver Art Museum. The museum's two wings are located on both sides of 13th Ave. and connected by a pedestrian bridge.

    The newest wing of the Denver Art Museum, designed by architect Daniel Libeskind, opened on October 7, 2006. The ultra-modern building stands in stark contrast to the medieval fortress that housed the older art museum.

    Admission for Colorado residents is $10 for adults, $8 for students/seniors, and free for children. (Out-of-state visitors pay a surcharge of $2 - $3 per ticket.) Call 720-865-5000 for more information.

    Hours:
    Tues. - Thurs. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
    Fri. 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
    Sat. and Sun. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
    Mon. Closed

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  • 03 of 07

    Denver Public Library: 10 W. 14th Ave.

    Denver Public Library
    ••• Blaine Harrington III/Getty Images

    Cross over to the other side of the plaza from the art museum to explore the Denver Public Library.

    The Central Library, designed by architect Michael Graves, receives more than one million visitors per year. The original library opened in 1956, and the new addition opened in 1995 as part of downtown Denver's renaissance. Take a free tour of the library, or browse through the collection of more than three million books. The Central branch is the largest library between Los Angeles and Chicago and houses a Western history collection.

    Admission is free. Call 720-865-1111 for more information. Any resident of Colorado may obtain a Denver Public Library card.

    Hours:
    Mon. - Tue. 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
    Wed. - Fri. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
    Sat. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
    Sun. 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

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  • 04 of 07

    State Capitol Building: 14th Ave. & Sherman St.

    Capitol Building, Denver, Colorado, America The Colorado State Capitol Building, located at 200 East Colfax Avenue. The building, designed by Elijah E. Myers, is similar to the United States Capitol. It was constructed in 1894. The gold dome consists of real gold leaf, first added in 1908, commemorating the Colorado Gold Rush.
    ••• joe daniel price/Getty Images

    Leave the Denver Public Library via the Broadway exit. Turn right from the library and cross Broadway at the light at 13th Ave., then cross Lincoln St. and turn left. Go north one block to 14th Ave. and you will see the State Capitol Building.

    Designed in the 19th century by architect Elijah E. Myers, the Colorado State Capitol Building echoes the classical lines of the nation's capitol. The capitol is exactly one mile high at 5,280 feet, lending Denver its nickname of the "Mile High City."

    Construction on the Capitol began in 1890 and was completed in 1908. The building houses the Colorado Legislature and Governor's office. Craftsmen laid 200 ounces of pure gold leaf onto the Dome.

    The Colorado State Capitol offers free 45-minute tours of the building on weekdays. Free tours of the dome are held from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Reservations are recommended as dome tours are limited to 30 people per hour. Call 303-866-2604 for reservations or more information.

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  • 05 of 07

    Civic Center Park: Between E. 14th Ave. and Bannock St.

    Grounds of Colorado State Capitol
    ••• Dave G. Houser/Getty Images

    Exit the State Capitol Building by the West entrance. Cross Lincoln St. to Civic Center Park.

    Civic Center Park ties together the threads of Capitol Hill and features a neoclassical amphitheater as well as flower gardens in the summer. The park hosts a farmer's market in the summer. Every Labor Day, the Taste of Colorado food festival also sets up shop.

    From the park, you can see the State Capitol to the East, the Denver Art Museum to the South, and the County Courthouse to the West. The North side of the park faces the Denver Rocky Mountain News building and other office buildings downtown. The park is officially open from 5 a.m. - 11 p.m. daily.

    Note: Please use caution in Civic Center Park at night. The park is fairly safe during the daytime.

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  • 06 of 07

    The Denver Mint: 320 W. Colfax Ave.

    United States Mint, Denver, Colorado
    ••• Peter Gridley/Getty Images

    From Civic Center Park, head West and cross Bannock St. Turn right until you hit Colfax Ave. Turn left and go three blocks down to 320 W. Colfax.

    The Denver Mint is one of four coin mints in the United States. The other three coin mints are located in Philadelphia, San Francisco and West Point, N.Y. The Denver facility produces coins of all denominations.

    The Denver Mint was founded in 1863 and moved to its current location in 1906. The current facility can produce up to 50 million dollars worth of coins in one day.

    The Mint offers free tours, but reservations are required. Call 303-405-4761 for more information. Walk-up reservations are available if space exists on the tours. The tours start every hour from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mon. - Fri.

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  • 07 of 07

    Pints Pub: 221 W. 13th Ave.

    Pints pub
    ••• Photo courtesy of Pints Pub

    From the Denver Mint, head south on Cherokee St. for two blocks. Then turn left onto 13th Ave., and you are back where you started the tour.

    Phew! Now that your feet are tired from all that walking, it's time to pull up a chair and have a beer. Pints Pub offers nothing in the way of historical or educational value. However, it is the only pub in Denver that boasts an authentic red British telephone booth out front.

    The pub brews its own ales, and also offers old standbys like Newcastle, Harp, and Guinness. Pints Pub opens at 11 a.m. every day of the week ​and offers Happy Hour Mon. - Fri. from 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Call 303-534-7543 for more information.

    For family-friendly fare, head across the street to Dozens Cafe at 236 W. 13th Ave., which offers breakfast and lunch.