Chip'n' Dale's Treehouse

01 of 03

Chip 'n' Dale's Treehouse at Disneyland California

Chip 'n' Dale's Treehouse at Disneyland
Eden, Janine and Jim/Flickr/CC BY 2.0

Chip 'n' Dale have the cutest little house in an oak tree, and you're invited to visit. You climb a spiral staircase into the heart of the tree to see how those two adorable, mischevious chipmunks live. 

If you ever say that old Chip 'n' Dale cartoon where they are trying to steal Donald Duck's boat, it may look especially familiar.

The treehouse is often overlooked, hidden at the back of Toontown and obscured by the line for Gadget's Go Coaster. And maybe some people think it's just a decoration and not something you can go inside to explore. It all adds up to small crowds and no waits.

The chipmunks are short fellows, and their treehouse fits them just right. It's also kid-sized, but adults may find it a little too small and the ceilings too short. Many parents choose to wait outside while their kids go through it.

What You Need to Know About Chip 'n' Dale Treehouse.

  • Location: Toontown
  • Rating: ★★
  • Restrictions: No height or age restrictions
  • Ride time: Most visitors spend less than 10 minutes
  • Recommended for: Younger children and adults who like the characters. Not for anyone with a fear of heights or small enclosed areas.
  • Fun Factor: Low
  • Wait Factor: Low
  • Accessibility: You have to be able to walk to access this attraction and to climb narrow, winding stairs. More about visiting Disneyland in a wheelchair or ECV
02 of 03

How to Have More Fun

Chip 'n' Dale's Treehouse at Night
Norm Lanier/Flickr/CC BY-NC 2.0
  • The treehouse closes when Toontown does, which may be earlier than the rest of the park, especially when there will be fireworks in the evening.
  • Chip 'n' Dale don't do character greetings at the treehouse, but you can find them in other parts of the Disneyland Resort, mostly around Critter Country or Frontierland.
  • The treehouse is an excellent place for kids with too much energy to burn off some of it.
  • There are no height restrictions, but taller adults (more than about 5'6") may have trouble fitting inside. That's a good excuse for those tired adults to sit outside and wait (rest) until the kids are done.
  • Kids over the age of six may think it's too babyish to get their grown-up attention.
  • If you're looking for a place to get some unique photos of Toontown, the view from Chip 'n' Dale's house is good for that.
  • Reviewers on Yelp give the treehouse moderate ratings, not as high as some but not as low as other houses in Toontown. They say "This attraction is one of those places that I really wish was something else" and "Kids love it. Not recommended for tall parents." Read more of their reviews to decide whether it's right for you and your kids.
  • Parents recommend close supervision when the kids are playing on the slides and climbing equipment.
  • If your kids like this treehouse, there's another one not too far away. Tarzan's Treehouse is over in Adventureland near the entrance to Indian Jones Adventure.
03 of 03

Fun Facts

Chip 'n' Dale Treehouse in Toontown
Loren Javier/Flickr/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Chip and Dale made their debut in 1943 in the cartoon Private Pluto. Their names are a pun on the word "Chippendale," the name of an 18th-century furniture maker - not that group of guys who seem to keep losing their clothing on stage.

Do you know how to tell them apart? It's easy! Just look at their noses. Chip's nose is black like a chocolate chip. The other guy with the red nose is Dale. They seldom appear separately. That may be because Chip is the brains of the duo. 

Some people (including the Disneyland website) say Chip 'n' Dale live in a redwood tree, but let's get our botany straight: Unless members of the Sequoia genus of trees have mutated to bear acorns, the chipmunks live in an oak.

The chipmunks also have a house in Tokyo Disneyland. The Disneyland attraction was originally Chip 'n' Dale Treehouse and Acorn Crawl.

In case you notice an empty pit, fenced off from visitors, it's the former acorn crawl, a ball-crawl with acorn-shaped balls which was closed due to safety and sanitation concerns.

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