Chinese New Year in Hong Kong

February 16th, 2018

CHINESE NEW YEAR FIREWORKS IN HONG KONG
Richard A. Brooks/Stone/Getty Images

The date for Chinese New Year shifts each year based on the phases of the moon. In 2018, Chinese New Year falls on February 16th. These are public holidays in Hong Kong. 

Traditions and Customs

Just like turkey and stockings at Christmas, Chinese New Year in Hong Kong has a long list of traditions and customs. Many of the traditions have a similar flavour to those during Christmas, such as visiting family and exchanging Lai See gifts, but some are unique. You'll find temples open around the clock, gifts piled up at the feet of the gods and flower markets packed from floor to ceiling with kumquat trees. Get familiar with the rituals of Chinese New Year below. 

Superstitions

The Chinese are firm believers in good and bad luck, and Chinese New Year is a veritable Russian roulette of both. Although there is nothing you can do to change the inherent luck in your star sign, Chinese New Year is the best opportunity to bank yourself some luck for the coming year. From not cleaning the house, to stowing away your scissors, there are plenty of traditions and superstitions designed to bring success and prosperity for the coming year.

What To See

Chinese New Year celebrations in local Chinatowns around the world are inspired by those in Hong Kong. Thanks to streams of emigration from the city, much of what is seen in Chinese celebrations from San Francisco to Sydney originated in Hong Kong. So while different parts of China all celebrate in different ways and with different traditions, the Hong Kong celebrations are those that most visitors are familiar with - essentially fireworks, dragon dances and a parade of carnival floats. 

Celebrations in Hong Kong are spread over three days and include fireworks over Victoria Harbour and an international cast of characters dancing and singing their way through Tsim Sha Tsui. Find out more about events in Hong Kong and around the world with the links below. 

Horoscopes

Each lunar year is dominated by one of the 12 Chinese animal signs, which in turn decides whether your year will be serene or stormy. Most of this depends on your own animal sign being on good terms with whichever animal sign rules the year, as well as a host of stars that decide everything from your career prospects to what color you should paint your kitchen.