Everything You Need To Know If You're In Town For Chicago Auto Show

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••• Photo courtesy of Chicago Auto Show

In Brief: The Chicago Auto Show bills itself as North America's oldest and largest of its kind. First held in 1901, this year marks the 109th event, which annually takes place in the South Loop neighborhood at McCormick Place.

When To Go

The 2017 Chicago Auto Show is open to the public Saturday, Feb. 11 through Monday, Feb. 20, with a special black-tie charity preview event on Friday, Feb. 10. Show hours are 9 a.m.-10 p.m. every day except Feb. 20, which are 10 a.m.-8 p.m.

Admission: Adults: $12
Senior citizens (62 or older) and children (seven-12): $6
Children six and under: Free with paid adult
Weekday group discounts available for groups of 20 or more; more info here.
Buy tickets online -- no service fees.

Discount Tickets: Half-price weekday tickets are available at participating Shell gas stations, car dealerships and Fifth Third bank locations.

First Look for Charity: A black-tie charity preview will be held 7-11 p.m. Friday, Feb. 10. More information

How To Get There

By car:

The Chicago Auto Show takes place at McCormick Place, located at Lake Shore Drive at 23rd St. Navigation systems should be programmed for 2301 S. Martin Luther King Dr., Chicago, Ill., 60616 (The Hyatt Regency McCormick Place is the official hotel for the event).

On-site parking is available at the three McCormick Place lots. Lots A and C cost $19, Lot B costs $14, with prices reduced to $10 after 6 pm. On weekends, parking is available at Millennium Park Garage for $16 with free shuttle service to and from the show.

By public transportation:

CTA has dedicated bus lines providing Auto Show service from CTA's downtown rail lines, Metra's Ogilvie Transportation Center, Union Station and LaSalle St. Station. On weekends only, there will be shuttle service to the Halsted station on the Orange line.

CTA routes 3-King Drive and 21-Cermak stop at McCormick Place, as does route 129 on weekday evening rush hours. A single CTA ride is $2.25. Find more information about CTA fares and transportation.

Metra electric line service from the Loop and southern suburbs and South Shore service from northeast Indiana, stops on the lower level of McCormick Place. Find more information regarding Metra fares and transportation.

What To See

See all the new vehicle introductions in the official Chicago Auto Show site.

Where To Stay

In the event the McCormick Place Hyatt is booked, there are a number of hotels in the downtown area to consider. Renaissance Blackstone Chicago Hotel, which is also located in the South Loop, is less than 10 minutes away from the Chicago Auto Show. The historic luxury property is directly across the street from Grant Park. It's played host to a number of U.S. presidents, dignitaries, celebrities and other notables, including Katharine Hepburn and Al "Scarface" Capone. Other area properties to consider include Chicago Athletic Association Hotel, Congress Plaza Hotel and Convention Center, Essex InnHampton Inn & Suites Downtown, Hilton Chicago and South Loop Hotel.

Where To Dine, Drink & Be Merry

  • We've gathered 10 favorite Chicago eateries guaranteed to make your entire family happy, from a few classic restaurants to newer attractions.
  • From appropriate flawless chef-driven destinations to a throwback pop-up spot certain to make your Chicago trip memorable, our selections cover all the bases of the city's best brunches.
  • Chicago's steakhouses take burgers to an entirely different level. Most boast in-house butcher programs, ensuring the best quality of beef, including U.S.D.A. prime, Tallgrass and locally raised meats. And when cooked correctly they make the juiciest, most flavorful offerings in town.
  • Several of the top taverns in town highlight the best regional, national and even international craft beers, while others feature only their own. These are some of our favorites.
  • Looking for a great place for pizza? We've compiled several of our favorites around town, including a spot offering brunch-styled pies to an eatery sourcing everything from scratch on premises, right down to the crust.
  • From a punk-rock lounge to an iconic jazz club where Al Capone used to hang out, these venues add color to Chicago’s live-music scene.