A Photo Tour of Cancer Survivor's Park

  • 01 of 08

    Introduction

    Photo by Teresa R. Simpson, licensed to About.com

    Cancer Survivor's Park
    East Side of Audubon Park
    Perkins Extended at Southern Avenue (across from Theatre Memphis)

    Although the Cancer Survivor's Park is a relatively new addition to Memphis, it is a concept that is being realized in cities across the nation. In fact, Memphis' is the 23rd Cancer Survivor's Park to be built in the United States. Opened in November of 2007, the park was funded by a grant from the R. A. Bloch Cancer Foundation and is intended to encourage, inspire, and celebrate survivorship. The links below will take you on a virtual tour of this beautiful and inspirational park.

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  • 02 of 08

    Labyrinth

    Photo by Teresa R. Simpson, licensed to About.com

    One of the first sights you will see from the parking lot at Cancer Survivor's Park is The Labyrinth. The Labyrinth is designed as a focused walk for visitors, representing the often twisted and complex journey to cancer recovery.

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  • 03 of 08

    Tree of Life

    Photo by Teresa R. Simpson, licensed to About.com

    Just beyond The Labyrinth is a beautiful mosaic work entitled "Tree of Life" by artist Kristi Duckworth. What makes this piece even more amazing is that the artist got cancer survivors and their families to paint some of the individual tiles that went into the mosaic.

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  • 04 of 08

    Positive Mental Attitude Walk

    Photo by Teresa R. Simpson, licensed to About.com

    This plaque is part of the Positive Mental Attitude Walk, a journey marked by fourteen different plaques -- four that are intended to inspire and ten with tips and suggestions for fighting cancer.

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  • 05 of 08

    Wildflowers

    Photo by Teresa R. Simpson, licensed to About.com

    Much of the 2 acres on which Cancer Survivor's Park is situated is covered by a variety of beautiful wildflowers in every color imaginable. These flowers are intended to attract butterflies, a symbol of transformation.

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  • 06 of 08

    Ready for Flight

    Photo by Teresa R. Simpson, licensed to About.com

    This sculpture by Yvonne Bobo with Tylur French was created of steel, bronze, copper, and aluminum. The butterfly is intended to represent the potential for radical transformation in cancer patients.

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  • 07 of 08

    The Long Journey

    Photo by Teresa R. Simpson, licensed to About.com

    Another sculpture by Yvonne Bobo and Tylur French, this one is made from carbon and stainless steel. The sculpture is designed to pay tribute to the monarchs' migration, a journey that can be compared to that of cancer survival.

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  • 08 of 08

    Cancer...There's Hope

    Photo by Teresa R. Simpson, licensed to About.com

    This inspirational sculpture by Victor Salmones represents the journey through cancer treatment. The three figures in the front have successfully completed their journeys, while the figures in the back are just beginning.