Top British Classic Holiday and Special Occasion Gifts for Her

Great presents from Britain for the women in your life

The classic English Rose is a game girl or a sporty woman who loves the outdoors (and has all the right, rugged outdoorsy clothes to enjoy it) but who also likes fresh and classic, natural scents and toiletries. Sound like anyone you know?

Like her, these gifts are English classics. They're bound to please any woman on your gift list who appreciates quality and recognizes a classic when she sees one.

  • 01 of 08

    A sturdy tweed can last a lifetime - and be passed on to another generation for re-tailoring into fashion of the day. Original Montgomery crafts a very stylish all rounder in this investment fabric, woven in Scotland, then tailored into a classic jacket in England. It's equally at home on snowy winter weekends around the fire, crisp autumnal walks in the country, or busy days at the office.

  • 02 of 08
    Barbour for her

    Barbour is synonymous with English country style. This classic waxed cotton jacket, styled for a woman, has a wool-mix lining to shed rain and chase off chills. There's a heavy duty front zipper with a storm flap, and a removable, visored hood. Plus there are lots of pockets (including a zippered inside pocket) so there's no need to be burdened with a handbag on a country walk. And this year, Barbour has introduced a lightweight, waxed silk jacket - adding a touch of luxury to their venerable classic. Use the store finder on the official Barbour website to find a stockist in your country. in the USA, retailer Orvis usually carries a selection of Barbour jackets for men and women.

  • 03 of 08

    These are the original "Wellies", invented by Hunter in the 1800s. The make is still considered, by some, to be the best that money can buy. They are hand assembled from 28 pieces, then heat processed into a comfy, fabric-lined, completely waterproof boot. Shapelier than galoshes, they're really a terrific all purpose boot for country life in the mucky seasons. 

  • 04 of 08

    Everything about this scent, from its pretty little bottle to its sentimental name, hints at a history almost as long as Penhaligon itself. The English perfumer has been around Covent Garden since the late 19th century. But in fact, Bluebell was introduced in 1978 and there is nothing sentimental at all about this perfume redolent of a spring walk in an English bluebell wood after a rain. Lovely. And, by appointment to Royals since William Penhaligon was named "Barber and Perfumer" to the Royal Court of Queen Victoria.

    Continue to 5 of 8 below.
  • 05 of 08
    A perfect present for a lass with her heart in the Highlands. This traditional Scottish design, in 925 Sterling Silver, makes a lovely lapel pin for every day. But if she's planning to wear traditional clan dress, it adds an authentic touch to a kilt or a tartan stole. Very pretty.
  • 06 of 08
    London skin care and fragrance specialist Jo Malone is well known for her unusual combinations of fresh, natural scents. Earl Grey tea, nectarine, lime, white grapefruit are among the scents that have shown up in her collections.

    I particularly like the combination of White Jasmine and Mint that's she's used to scent a whole wardrobe of fragrances - including Eau de Parfum spray, cologne, shower gel, bath oil, and an irresistibly creamy body mousse.

  • 07 of 08
    Floris has made perfume in London for more than 275 years. Older than competitor Penhaligon's, but, like them, holding two Royal Warrants, they were founded by a gentleman from Menorca who created scents to remind him of his Mediterranean home. Trained as a perfumer in the South of France, Juan Famanias Floris was soon blending the perfumes that were all the rage of London's 18th century high society.

    Today, the business is owned by the eight generation of the same family. Its archives include correspondence with such customers as Florence Nightingale, Mary Shelly and Beau Brummel.

    Despite all this history, China Rose - a complex bouquet of exotic roses - is a rich and sensual fragrance for a confident modern woman.

  • 08 of 08
    You can't get much more English than an English Rose. British designer Paul Smith turns the whole concept on its head with this airy, light and modern interpretation. There's nothing of the tuberose or tea rose, nothing even slightly heavy about this technological scent. According to the claims, it's made from living scent, without any actual flowers being harvested. Now your guess is as good as mine as to what that means. But it smells nice and you can assure recipients of a nervous disposition that no flowers were killed or harmed in its making.