Biggest Camino de Santiago Dangers & Annoyances

What Can Go Wrong on the Camino and How to Prevent It

The Camino de Santiago is mainly a very enjoyable experience - but there are hazards associated with walking 800 to 900km in little over a month. This is a list of possible dangers on the Walk of St James - the ones nearer to the top are the ones you should most be concerned about.

  • 01 of 10

    Blisters

    Blisters are the most common problem on the Camino
    ••• Blisters are the most common problem on the Camino. Holly Harris/Getty Images

    Blisters are the most common ailment suffered by pilgrims on the Camino de Santiago. But they're easily avoidable - I only suffered from them very briefly and I know exactly why (the insoles in my shoes had worn away.

    A popular type of band aid popular with pilgrims is called 'compeed'. You can buy them at any farmacia on the route. You can buy an American alternative here: Spenco 2nd Skin Blister Pads (buy direct)

  • 02 of 10

    Tendonitis

    The achilles tendon is most likely place to get tendonitis on the Camino
    ••• The achilles tendon is most likely place to get tendonitis on the Camino. Sebastian Kaulitzki/Getty Images

    If you get blisters and you start to walk differently, you may get tendonitis as a result. Even if you haven't got blisters, tendonitis is a common problem for pilgrims. Most people I met were able to overcome their injury with a little rest (either stopping completely or walking shorter days). If you don't speak Spanish, ask a Spanish speaker to help you at the pharmacy.

  • 03 of 10

    Back Pain

    Back pain is less common but potentially more dangerous
    ••• Back pain is less common but potentially more dangerous. Simon Potter/Getty Images

    Carrying too much and in an ill-fitting bag will cause back problems, as will walking with a bad posture. Make sure your bag has all the right straps and is tightened in all the right places and that you are walking 'properly'.

  • 04 of 10

    Broken or Ineffective Equipment

    Your sneakers might not last the entire journey!
    ••• Your sneakers might not last the entire journey!. Tooga/Getty Images

    A bag or a pair of shoes that seem fine when you try them on in the shop may not be right after you've worn them for 100, 200 or 300km. So where do you go to get new equipment?

    There are a few good places to get sports and camping equipment from on the Camino.

    Continue to 5 of 10 below.
  • 05 of 10

    Bad Knees

    Look after your blisters and the knees will follow!
    ••• Look after your blisters and the knees will follow!. PhotoAlto/Odilon Dimier/Getty Images

    This was the problem that I suffered with most. It is largely due to carrying too much equipment, which I was definitely guilty of. It is also important to walk properly. I was walking with a hiking cane and found I was relying too much on it, meaning I was dropping myself too hard onto one foot.

    Though everyone dreads the uphill climbs before they take part in the Camino, it is actually walking downhill that is most likely to cause injuries, especially to the knees.

  • 06 of 10

    Sunburn and Heatstroke

    Cover up to prevent sunburn on the Camino
    ••• Cover up to prevent sunburn on the Camino. Samantha T. Photography/Getty Images

    Spain is a hot country and even though the north is more meteorologically temperamental than, say, Andalusia, high temperatures are common and a lot of the Camino is very exposed.

    Normal precautions apply - get yourself a small bottle of (at least) factor 30 sunblock. A good all-weather clothing option is a light buttoned shirt - the long sleeves can keep the sun off or they can be rolled back when there is cloud cover, while such a shirt is great for the chilly mornings too.

  • 07 of 10

    Getting Lost

    Signs like these - and unambiguous paths mean it's usually hard to get lost
    ••• Signs like these - and unambiguous paths mean it's usually hard to get lost. Luca Pierro/Getty Images

    Another fear that is unwarranted is that of getting lost. The Camino is very well marked and getting lost is very unlikely. If you do wander off the path, just three Spanish words will get you back on track: '¿Para el Camino? (for the Camino?). Every local will know where you need to go and will point you in the right direction. Even without these three words, who you are and where you're going will be pretty obvious to most locals!

    Most pilgrims bring a guide book that has maps of the route in it. This is useful in the evenings when planning your route for the next day, but as there will be about 20 guide books around you every evening, you don't need to buy your own - just borrow! Alternatively, get this lightweight Camino map book.

  • 08 of 10

    Exhaustion and Dehydration

    Drink plenty of water while on the Camino
    ••• Drink plenty of water while on the Camino. Jordan Siemens/Getty Images

    Many potential pilgrims look at the 800km walk ahead of them and panic about how far they have to walk each day. However, I saw few people suffering from this problem.

    Walk at your own pace, eat appropriately and drink regularly (sports drinks if possible). Take the steep sections slowly and don't over exert yourself. Give yourself enough time to do the Camino so you can take shorter days where necessary.

    A list of the towns and villages coming up, with details of their facilities and the distance between them is essential. This will help you decide if you need stop here or wait till the next town. Email Red de Albergues for their excellent leaflet with all of this information.

    Continue to 9 of 10 below.
  • 09 of 10

    Pre-Existing Medical Conditions

    If you have a pre-existing medical condition, check with your doctor before you start the Camino
    ••• If you have a pre-existing medical condition, check with your doctor before you start the Camino. Diane Labombarbe/Getty Images

    Only you know if you can do the Camino. While I would tell anyone in a generally good state of health that the Camino is much easier than they realise, the fact that people do die on the Camino suggests that there are people who bite off more than they can chew. If you have (or suspect you have) a bad heart, asthma, a heart condition, arthritis or other pre-existing ailment that you think may impede your progress on the Camino, consult your doctor before you travel.

    While on the Camino itself, take a mobile phone and remember that 112 is the emergency services number in Spain. They have English speaking operators.

  • 10 of 10

    Traffic Accidents

    Be careful of cars on the Camino
    ••• Be careful of cars on the Camino. Maxim Chuvashov/Getty Images

    By the side of the road on the way into Estella is a memorial to a Canadian lady who tragically lost her life after she was hit by a drunk driver. Of the 100,000 people who walk the Camino each year, she is the only death I have heard of, but there is certainly a risk. If you plan on walking before sun rise, consider taking reflective gear and make sure you wear it on Saturday and Sunday mornings, when drunk drivers are most likely to be on the road.