The Best Time to Visit Maine

Maine Summer Lobster Boats

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Mainers, with their wry sense of humor, often joke that New England's northernmost state has only two seasons: winter and the Fourth of July. The best time to visit Maine is in the summer when all of the recreational possibilities of seacoast and mountains combine to help Maine live up to its "Vacationland" nickname. August is the ultimate month for a Maine vacation. September's a close second, particularly if you're unencumbered by school-aged children.

There's more to consider, though, as you choose a time for your Maine adventure. Each season repaints Maine in a fresh palette that is strikingly beautiful, and with nature's color shifts come diverse ways for travelers to explore and appreciate this wild and scenic state.

The Weather in Maine

Maine has four distinct seasons: winter, spring, summer, and fall. Each has pluses, minuses, and a degree of unpredictability. While winter offers up starry nights, it also can be downright frigid. The first snowfall can happen in November, sometimes in October, and spring starts any time between mid-March and mid-May.

Precipitation is something you can count on year-round, and spring's cold rain makes Mainers miss the snow. Hurricanes are rare and the benefit of Maine's cooler climate is a summer season that sparkles with moderately warm temperatures perfect for outdoor pursuits, from hiking and biking to chowing down lobsters.

Be mindful of the fact that weather conditions in Maine can change on a dime. If you're hiking in the mountains or setting out on a boat, you'll want to monitor the weather forecast and be prepared for falling temperatures and pop-up storms.

Heavy spring rains create a lot of mud in March and April, making for a mucky early spring. Back roads can be treacherous when the ground is oversaturated with melted snow, so travel with caution. If you're hoping to enjoy the outdoors, avoid visiting during black fly season (mid-May through mid-June) at all costs. The biting insects congregate in the woods and will cover you in incredibly itchy bumps.

Peak Season in Maine

Maine's best beach hotels come at a premium in the summer months and ski resort prices skyrocket in winter, particularly during holiday and school vacation weeks. Throughout the year, lodgings will nearly always cost you more on weekends than on midweek nights.

September is something of a best-kept secret in Maine. Lodging prices, particularly on the coast, fall from their summer highs, and they'll stay on the low side until late in the month when leaf peepers begin to arrive. Ocean waters are still at their warmest, but beach crowds have disappeared, and you'll face less traffic on interstates if you're headed to Maine on a Friday after work.

Lobster prices tend to deflate, too, after summer crowds depart, and it's another little-known bonus that lobsters caught in the fall tend to be of the meatier hard-shell variety. That said: Many of the state's most famous lobster shacks close after Labor Day or Columbus Day (rechristened Indigenous Peoples' Day in Maine). Some seaside hotels and motels are seasonal, too, so if you're planning an off-season ocean escape, look to towns like Kennebunkport and Freeport that have worked hard to stay on tourists' radar year-round.

Summer

With pleasantly warm temperatures, summertime vacationers love lazing on Maine's lake and ocean beaches, visiting charming seaside towns, exploring Acadia National Park, driving along the coast to see some of New England's prettiest lighthouses, and feasting on lobster in the rough (outdoors with few frills).

Events to check out:

  • Yarmouth Clam Festival: Starting the third Friday in July, this three-day festival in Yarmouth, Maine is your chance to eat clams every which way and to enjoy a packed schedule of old-fashioned entertainment.
  • Maine Lobster Festival: Held in Rockland, Maine, for five days running from the end of July into August, this long-standing celebration of the state's signature crustacean features top musical acts, competitions, a parade, and 20,000 pounds of fresh lobster.

Fall

Fans of autumn in Maine scoop up reservations at scenic inns and hotels months before the leaves start to change. Bethel is the state's best foliage-viewing home base, and there are gorgeous drives to follow and day trips to take that showcase fall's finest experiences, from antiquing to apple tasting.

Events to check out:

  • Fryeburg Fair: Regarded as Maine's best agricultural fair, this annual tradition in Fryeburg is eight days of guaranteed fall fun.
  • Damariscotta Pumpkinfest & Regatta: Always on Columbus Day Weekend, this photo-op-filled celebration of gigantic pumpkins in Damariscotta, Maine, features a parade, pumpkin-boat regatta, giant pumpkin drop, and more zany events.

Winter

With premier ski resorts like Sunday River and Sugarloaf, plus smaller mountains that make the list of New England's cheapest places to ski, Maine offers downhilling for all budgets throughout the snowy winter months. Maine is also New England's snowmobiling capital, a fine place to ice skate, and—when it's really too bitter to be outdoors—a great destination for beer.

Events to check out:

  • Boothbay Lights: The centerpiece of this six-week holiday happening, which lights up all of Maine's Boothbay peninsula, is Gardens Aglow: a display of 500,000 LEDs at the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens.
  • Kennebunkport Christmas Prelude: For 11 December days and nights, Kennebunkport is a festive destination for events, like the lighting of the lobster trap tree, that will put you in the holiday spirit.

Spring in Maine

Spring may be Maine's least popular season, but it's the peak time to visit if you want to see waterfalls at their most dramatic and taste the year's new crop of maple syrup.

Events to check out:

  • Maine Maple Sunday: On the fourth Sunday in March, sugarhouses statewide open their doors for tours, demonstrations, and, most importantly, tastings.
  • Maine Flower Show: Just when it seems as if spring will never arrive, this annual indoor celebration of all things floral in Portland the last weekend in March revives the winter-weary.
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