The 8 Best Teotihuacan Tours of 2019

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products and services; you can learn more about our review process here. We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

The Rundown

01 of 08

Best Overall: Mexico: Private Tour to Teotihuacan

Teotihuacan

Getty Images

For a tour that includes transportation from Mexico City at a low price, the “Mexico Private Tour to Teotihuacan,” is a solid choice and great bang-for-your-buck. This six-hour tour is ideal for those who want to spend as much time as possible exploring the ruins (so no museum stops or tequila tastings cutting into time at the site). However, once back in Mexico City, travelers have the option to extend the tour to visit places like the Xochimilco neighborhood to see the famous canals, the Frida Kahlo Museum, the Guadalupe Shrine or other attractions. At Teotihuacan, spend three hours learning about the site, climbing the pyramids of the Sun and the Moon and walking down Avenue of the Dead. 

02 of 08

Best Aerial: Basic Shared Flight - Balloon Flying

Teotihuacan

 Getty Images

For an unforgettable aerial flight over Teotihuacán, book the “Basic Shared Flight Balloon Flying” trip. On a 45-minute flight, adventurers will float over the Archaeological zone of Teotihuacán, with a chance to see the Pyramid of the Moon or the Temple of Quetzalcoátl, depending on the way the wind blows. On a clear day, there’s also a chance to see the Popocatepetl and Iztaccíhuatl volcanoes, and several other colorful balloons are often sprinkled in the skyline. Before the early morning flight, tourists can have coffee and will also enjoy a toast with sparkling wine later. The entire experience takes about 2.5 hours and includes a certificate marking the voyage. 

03 of 08

Best History: Teotihuacan Archaeology Tour

Quetzalpapalotl Palace

Getty Images

The “Teotihuacan Archaeology Tour” is ideal for history buffs who want to learn more about the city than a basic overview tour. The expert art-historian guide (with a degree in Anthropology) has more than 12 years of knowledge of the UNESCO World Heritage site and shares the information on a two- to four-hour walking tour. The tour explores all the top landmarks like the Citadel, the Avenue of the Dead, Sun and Moon pyramids, and Quetzalpapalotl Palace, but also takes a closer look at murals and dives into the archaeological significance and new discoveries as well. The tour leaves in the morning right from the site, so travelers will catch the sunrise over the pyramids. 

04 of 08

Best Local Experience: Teotihuacan (Private Transportation, Tour & Food)

Teotihuacan

Getty Images

Departing from Paseo de la Reforma, a bustling street in Mexico City, the 5.5-hour tour begins with transport to Teotihuacan. Here, the small group (no more than 10) will visit Sun and Moon Pyramids, the Palace of Quetzalpapalotl, the museum, and the paintings during a four-hour walking tour and will hear about the history and stories from a local guide. Afterward, head to a nearby village for a traditional, home-cooked Mexican cuisine making for a cozy, authentic experience. Hotel pick up and drop off are also available, and entrance fees into the ruins are part of the package.

Continue to 5 of 8 below.
05 of 08

Best Value: Teotihuacan Morning Tour with a Private Archeologist and Liquors Tasting

Teotihuacan

Getty Images

Those traveling on a budget who want a little taste of everything at an affordable price should consider the “Mexico City Early Morning Teotihuacán Pyramids Tour with a Private Archeologist.” The tour gets an early start, so you’ll get some exploring in before the day heats up, but note that departure is limited to two points in Mexico City. Travelers can experience the site with a narrative from the guide before the crowds arrive. After, they’ll get a chance to visit an obsidian factory and sample liquor tastings of tequila, mezcal, and pulque. The tour lasts eight hours so travelers may want to pack snacks or their own lunch because meals are not included.

06 of 08

Best Full Day Tour: Teotihuacán Full Day from Mexico City

Teotihuacan

Getty Images

For a well-rounded day that includes an in-depth look at Teotihuacan as well as other aspects of history and culture, the “Teotihuacan Full-Day Tour from Mexico City,” is an excellent choice. The eight-hour experience begins with hotel pick up in Mexico City and transportation to the UNESCO World Heritage site to visit the citadel and Pyramid of Quetzalcoatl. Next, take a break from the ruins to view an art mural in a historic neighborhood before climbing the Pyramid of the Sun and Moon and visiting the Butterfly Palace. Travelers will then take a bike tour to a craft workshop, learn about the obsidian (volcanic glass), taste Pulque (an alcoholic drink made from sap), and enjoy an included lunch. 

07 of 08

Best Combo Tour: Private Tour: Teotihuacan and Guadalupe Shrine

Guadalupe Shrine

While many of the Teotihuacan tours focus entirely on the archaeological ruins, the six-hour, “Private Tour Teotihuacan and Guadalupe Shrine,” packs in stops at two other historical sites. After a morning hotel pick-up, the tour visits Tlatelolco, an ancient Aztec site that’s home to modern buildings and pre-Columbian structures – making it a unique attraction. Next up is the Guadalupe Shrine, a Catholic Basilica and famous pilgrimage site where travelers will hear stories about miracles performed there and the importance of the shrine to Mexican culture. The tour concludes with a stop at the Teotihuacan site and to snap some photos from the top of the Sun Pyramid, followed by lunch at a local restaurant. 

08 of 08

Best Active Tour: Teotihuacan by Bicycle

Teotihuacan

Getty Images

Active travelers who appreciate history will enjoy the four-hour, “Teotihuacan by Bicycle Tour.” This experience begins with an early morning departure from two locations in Mexico City, followed by a visit to the Pyramid of the Sun at Teotihuacan. Travelers will bike ride over various terrain around the archaeological city, as well as through the nearby village. The guide provides narrative to help better understand how the ancient civilization thrived and pauses for breaks and energy drinks. The tour also stops by caves, a cactus garden, a suspension bridge, and a restaurant in a nearby town for a chance to try Mexican cuisine (food is an additional charge).

Was this page helpful?