The 10 Best Snowboarding Gloves of 2022

These gloves will keep your digits dry and warm in the resort and backcountry

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The Rundown

Best Overall: Mammut Masao 3-in-1 Glove at Backcountry

"Three glove solutions in one."

Best Value: Kinco 1927KW Glove at Amazon

"Porous nature makes it very durable, yet it remains soft and flexible even if it gets wet. "

Best for Women: Hestra Army Leather Patrol Female Mitt at Amazon

"Warmer than traditional five-finger glove designs"

Bests for Kids: Flylow Mighty Mitt at Amazon

"The low-priced glove utilizes a mitten-style construction, which is warmer than five-finger gloves."

Best for Backcountry: Black Diamond Legend Glove at Backcountry

"The Black Diamond Legend glove hits the sweet spot backcountry riders want."

Best Three-Finger Glove: Dakine Baron Gore-Tex Trigger Mitt at Amazon

"Provides radiant heat for three fingers while freeing up the index finger to make manual tasks easier."

Best for Spring Snowboarding: The North Face Flight Glove at The North Face

" Comes with a weather-resistant shell to shrug off snow and slush, with a stretch-woven fabric on the back of the hand to offer flex without bulk."

Best in Stormy Conditions: Outdoor Research Carbide Sensor Glove at REI

"Outdoor Research also baked in plenty of other cold-weather-friendly features."

Best for Resort Skiing: Burton Gore-Tex Glove at REI

"Durable enough to outlast several seasons."

Best for Extreme Cold: Gordini Polar Mitt at Amazon

"The fingers benefit from the residual warmth of the mitten construction."

Gloves can take a lot of punishment while snowboarding. In addition to fending off snow and ice and keeping your hands toasty, they also have to be durable enough to stand up to the rigors of snowboarding, like handling sharp edges, and lots of time spent touching the snow, while still allowing for ample dexterity to adjust bindings and answer incoming calls.

Some of the best do it all—employing three-in-one designs to provide versatility in a variety of riding conditions and touchscreen-compatible digits. Others hone in key features—serious warmth, weather protection, or streamlined insulation for warmer conditions—to handle the outer edges of a long snowboarding season.

These are the best snowboarding gloves for the 2021-2022 season.

Best Overall: Mammut Masao 3-in-1 Glove

Mammut Masao 3-in-1 Glove

Courtesy of Backcountry

What We Like
  • Versatile

  • Reasonably priced

What We Don't Like
  • Only available in black


The secret to the Masao 3-in-1 Glove from Mammut lies in its versatility. As its name articulates, it’s actually three glove solutions in one. On bitterly cold days, the Primaloft-insulated outer glove will keep you warm and dry, thanks to a proprietary waterproof and breathable Dry Technology membrane. Meanwhile, the Pontetorto Technostretch fleece inner glove provides a touch of extra insulation and unencumbered movement.

When things heat up, ditch the outer shell, which will give you better dexterity as well as touchscreen compatibility. And if the weather hovers in between and conditions are soggy, the outer shell can also be worn solo. Goat leather covers the entire palm of the outer glove, giving you an uncompromised grip that’s buoyed further by a pre-shaped hand construction. Hem drawstrings at the cuff are one-hand operations, and you also get loads of add-ons like a glove leash (to avoid dropping them on the lift), a carabiner webbing, wrist adjustments, and additional leather between the thumb and index finger for added durability.

Insulation: PrimaLoft Silver | Materials: Goat leather and textiles | Sizes: European, from 6 to 12

Best Value: Kinco 1927KW Glove

Kinco 1927KW

Courtesy of REI

What We Like
  • Price

  • Simplicity

  • Plush overall comfort

What We Don't Like
  • No fit adjustments at the wrist or cuff, and the looser feel than more technical gloves takes some getting used to.

Kinco has been making gloves since 1975, and the family-owned business has earned a loyal following, especially among lift workers and mountain locals because of the gloves’ affordable pricing and reliable quality. At first blush, the popular 1927KW looks more like a traditional work glove than something snowboard-specific. But work is the optimal takeaway, with premium grain pigskin integrated throughout most of the glove, whose porous nature makes it very durable, yet it remains soft and flexible even when wet.

The brand’s trademarked Otto striped cotton-blend canvas lines the top and cuffs to provide breathable coverage, along with a poly elastic knit at the wrist to lock in the heat. Warmth is provided with a signature Heatkeep thermal insulation, which has been laminated with a soft inner lining to trap the natural heat generated by your hands, repel the cold and wet, and wick away sweat. It’s not the most teched-out glove on the market, but that’s precisely why so many winter warriors love the 1927KW.

Insulation: Thermal | Materials: Proprietary cotton blend and pigskin | Sizes: XS to XXL

Best for Women: Hestra Army Leather Patrol Female Mitt

Hestra Army Leather Patrol Female Mitt

Courtesy of Hestra

What We Like
  • Warm

  • Versatile

What We Don't Like
  • Some may prefer a gauntlet-style cuff

Warmer than traditional five-finger glove designs, the Hestra Army Leather Patrol Female Mitt comes with a removable polyester lining with G-loft insulation, which pairs with a weatherproof outer layer that’s a mix of leather in the palm as well as Hestra’s Dobby Polyester Melange fabric on the backhand. The modest Neoprene cuff closes with Velcro and should marry nicely with most winter shells. Bonus: Elastic wrist leashes help avoid dropping the gloves, and a removable carabiner clip makes it easy to store them out of the way when not in use.

Insulation: G-loft | Materials: Polyester fabric and leather | Sizes: European, 6 to 9

Bests for Kids: Flylow Mighty Mitt

Flylow Mighty Mitt Kids Mitten

Courtesy of Amazon

What We Like
  • Price

  • Simplicity

What We Don't Like
  • No firm way to lock down the cuff means you’ll probably want to assure that the sleeves provide plenty of coverage.

The secret to keeping kids happy while snowboarding? Remove anything that might cause them to complain. Cold fingers can rank high on that list. Flylow’s Mighty Mitt offers a stellar solution. The low-priced glove utilizes a mitten-style construction, which is warmer than five-finger gloves, with pre-treated DWR leather outers that block out the elements and stay soft and pliable, with a mix of insulation (200 grams on the back, 100 on the front) for dawn-to-dusk warmth. The poly lining wicks sweat naturally, and a flexible nylon cuff fits well. Other than a simple clip to attach the gloves, there aren’t any other bells or whistles, emphasizing simplicity rather than adding complex features that a kid would probably never use.

Insulation: Spaceloft (200 grams on the back, 100 on the front) | Materials: Leather, polyester, nylon | Sizes: K1 to K4

Best for Backcountry: Black Diamond Legend Glove

Black Diamond Legend Glove

Courtesy of Backcountry

What We Like
  • Provides the right degree of insulation

  • Loads of dexterity

What We Don't Like
  • The cuff style splits the difference between a shorter, streamlined cuff and a wider gauntlet

With a temp rating range from zero to 30 degrees F, the Black Diamond Legend glove hits the sweet spot backcountry riders want: warm enough to keep the fingers moving in low temps, but not so warm that they overheat when skinning or hiking. A Gore-Tex layer provides waterproof yet breathable protection, while 170 grams of PrimaLoft Gold insulation adds warmth. Inside, a buttery-soft fleece lining adds a cozy overall feel without sacrificing dexterity, thanks in part to the 3D articulated patterning in the glove’s design. Sheep leather on the palm and fingers improve your grip, and the abrasion-resistant Pertex outer shell will stand up to seasons of abuse. A touch of Velcro at the cuff makes it easy to optimize the fit.

Insulation: PrimaLoft Gold (170 grams) | Materials: Sheep leather, Pertex | Sizes: XS to XL.

Best Three-Finger Glove: Dakine Baron Gore-Tex Trigger Mitt

Dakine Baron Gore Tex Trigger Mitt

Courtesy of Dick's Sporting Goods

What We Like
  • Suitable blend of warmth and dexterity

What We Don't Like
  • The stretch cuff may not work with all winter jackets

Three-finger gloves like the Dakine Baron Trigger Mitt split the difference between the warmth of a mitten and the dexterity of a five-fingered model, providing radiant heat for three fingers while freeing up the index finger to make manual tasks easier. A Gore-Tex liner keeps things dry, while a mix of PrimaLoft Gold insulation and a soft-to-the-touch wool lining provides all-condition warmth. The bulk of the glove is crafted from durable, grippy goat leather, along with soft shell polyester and 3 percent Elastane for a touch of stretch. The elastic wrist leashes can be ditched if you want.

Insulation: PrimaLoft Gold (230 grams), wool blend (360 grams) | Materials: Goat leather, softshell polyester | Sizes: S to XL.

Best for Spring Snowboarding: The North Face Flight Glove

The North Face Flight Glove

Courtesy of Moosejaw

What We Like
  • Streamlined for spring

  • Inexpensive

What We Don't Like
  • The flexible cuff may not provide the protection all riders want.

Snowboarding in the spring brings warmer temps, longer days under the sun, and—refreshingly—less of a need for bomber gear typical in the dead of winter. The lightweight Flight Glove from The North Face comes with a weather-resistant shell to shrug off snow and slush, with a stretch-woven fabric on the back of the hand to offer flex without bulk. Insulation is nominal with the Flight Glove, which pairs with Radiometric Articulation (construction that matches the position of your hands in their natural resting position) and a V-seamed fingertip construction to provide best-in-class dexterity. Bonus: The index finger and thumbs are both touchscreen-compatible.

Insulation: None | Materials: Polyester | Sizes: XXS to XL

Best in Stormy Conditions: Outdoor Research Carbide Sensor Glove

Outdoor Research Carbide Sensor Gloves

Courtesy of REI

What We Like
  • Bomber protection

  • Nice long gauntlet cuff

What We Don't Like
  • Overkill in milder temps

Near white-out conditions in a blizzard with plunging temps is difficult enough to navigate without your fingers going numb. So when you’re expecting the worst winter weather can deliver, go with the Carbide Sensor glove from Outdoor Research. Gore-Tex has been employed to provide wind and weather protection without sacrificing breathability. Wrist sinches are constructed from durable, stretch webbing that locks in the heat and keeps out the snow, while VerticalX recycled poly insulation (130 grams on the back, 200 grams elsewhere) provides ample warmth. A goat leather palm proves durable and dexterous. And the pre-curved construction lets your hands sit comfortably in the rest position, affording a much more streamlined structure. Outdoor Research also baked in plenty of other smart cold-weather-friendly features, including a touchscreen-compatible index finger and thumb, a removable leash, pull-on loop, glove clips, and a soft nose wipe on the thumb.

Insulation: VerticalX polyester (130 grams on back, 200 grams elsewhere) | Materials: Stretch nylon twill and goat leather | Sizes: S to XL

Best for Resort Skiing: Burton Gore-Tex Glove

Burton Gore-Tex Glove

Courtesy of REI

What We Like
  • Versatile

  • Comes in a variety of colors

What We Don't Like
  • Some dexterity is lost when using both at the same time

The optimal snowboarding glove for in-bounds riding needs to accomplish a lot. It has to be warm when riding the lift on the coldest days of winter, shift to an easy-to-cool-down solution for when you’re aggressively carving, and durable enough to outlast several seasons. And the Gore-Tex Glove from snowboard superstars Burton does it all. This three-in-one design includes an outer shell made from the brand’s DRYRIDE 2L fabric and a Gore-Tex membrane for waterproof and breathable protection. Inside, a four-way stretch fleece liner wicks away sweat.

Wear both when temps are truly cold, opt for the outer shell when things are wet but not that cool, and don the liner for warmer weather pursuits. The synthetic leather outer provides touchscreen compatibility at the finger and thumb, while all fingers on the inner liner come with the same Screen Grab tech. The zip on the back of each glove can also serve dual purposes—either as a vent or as a pocket for a hand warmer.

Insulation: Thermacore | Materials: DRYRIDE and synthetic leather (outer), four-way stretch (inner) | Sizes: XXS to XXL

Best for Extreme Cold: Gordini Polar Mitt

Gordini Polar Mitt

Courtesy of Backcountry

What We Like
  • Warm

  • Adjustable

  • Easy to seal tight

What We Don't Like
  • Not as dexterous

With 750-fill DownTek insulation at the back of the hand and Megaloft synthetic insulation at the palm, the aptly named Polar Mitt from Gordini is one of the warmest gloves on the market. The fingers benefit from the residual warmth of the mitten construction, while the water-resistant outer shell blocks out the elements, including harsh winds and pummelling snow.

Four-way stretch nylon allows the profile to remain relatively streamlined for such a warm glove, and a moisture-wicking lining helps regulate the internal temps and partners with a proprietary AquaBloc breathable insert to keep things from wetting out inside the glove. Adjustments at both the wrist and at the end of the gauntlet cuff let you dial the optimal fit, and deerskin accents and a grippy palm provide durability.

Insulation: 750-fill DownTek on the back, Megaloft synthetic at the palm | Materials: Four-way stretch nylon with deerskin accents | Sizes: S to XXL.

Final Verdict

The optimal snowboarding gloves should work in any condition, from near-zero-degree temps to navigating through spring slush. Mammut’s Maseo 3-in-1 Glove delivers, with three “wearing” options. Toss on the inner glove solo for warmer weather, use both the inner and the outer shell for cold conditions, or just the outer when you want waterproof protection with a touch less insulation. Goat leather across the entire palm makes them durable and dexterous, and PrimaLoft Silver insulation in the outer amps the warmth.

But if you want a warmer pair that doesn’t trap all your fingers in a mitt-style glove, go with the Dakine Baron Gore-Tex Trigger Mitt, a three-finger model that frees up the index finger, while still keeping the rest of the hand quite warm. Gore-Tex assures waterproof and breathable protection and a mix of PrimaLoft Gold and wool insulation layers in the warmth.

What to Look For in Snowboarding Gloves

Warmth

Insulation is a given in most snowboarding gloves, so your hands don’t get cold on lower-temp, hard-charging days. But the trick is to figure out the right degree of insulation. Otherwise, your hands will get too hot or, worse, too cold. Consider where you typically ride and how you like to ride. Resort-goers should look for ample insulation (especially in the dead of winter) to help weather the long lift rides, while backcountry riders or fair-weather adventurers can go with less insulation. Three-in-one gloves (which consist of a removable inner glove that can go solo or be worn over an insulated outer layer, which can also be worn on its own) offer perhaps the best of both worlds. And if you’re prone to cold fingers, mitten-style gloves are much warmer than five-finger models.

Waterproofness

Another essential in snowboarding gloves, you need products with bomber materials that confidently keep snow, rain, and slush outside the glove at all times, along with cuffs that can either be synched down or folded under your jacket sleeves. But you also want a pair of gloves that breathe to help you regulate the inner temperature so your hands don’t overheat, sweat, or get clammy. Gore-Tex makes the most well-known waterproof yet breathable membranes, but lots of brands use proprietary technology to provide the same function. 

Dexterity

Long story short, the more insulation, the less dexterity. But some well-insulated gloves still provide surprising dexterity by body-mapping their glove designs to the position of your hands when they’re relaxed, which helps remove excess fabric and provides a better touch. Naturally, five-finger gloves are more dexterous than mittens, with “three-finger” gloves splitting the difference between dexterity and warmth.

Durability

Most modern snowboarding gloves are built to be tough enough to last several seasons thanks to the use of rugged textiles or leather, which stand up to abrasions and abuse. But if you want a really durable pair, look for gloves that boast double-stitched or sealed seams, ample use of leather in both the outer and on the palm, and cuffs that have several sync points (at the wrist and cuff).

Why Trust TripSavvy?

Nathan Borchelt has been testing, rating, and reviewing outdoor and travel products for decades, with a special emphasis on cold-weather apparel and hard goods. All the gloves in this round-up were evaluated based on price, warmth, durability, waterproofness, insulation properties, and dexterity, and were tested in both resort and backcountry settings.

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