The 9 Best Snowboard Gloves of 2019

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The Rundown

Best Overall: Dakine Excursion Glove at Amazon

"Delivers serious warmth and weather protection."

Best Value: Burton Gore-Tex Gloves at Amazon

"Score the confidence that Gore-Tex provides without shelling out more than $100."

Best Three-Finger Glove: Flylow Maine Line Glove at Amazon

"Combines the dexterity of a five-fingered glove and the warmth of a standard mitten."

Best for All Seasons: Helly Hansen Odin Gloves at Amazon

"Perfect if you're looking for one glove to match all conditions and all temps."

Best for Resort Skiing: Obermeyer Guide Glove at Amazon

"It’ll keep the casual resort snowboarder warm, dry, and ready for the next lift ride."

Best for Women: Oros Endeavour Mittens at Oros

"Uses Solarcore to deliver serious warmth."

Best for Kids: Gordini Jr Gore-Tex IV Gloves at Amazon

"Features a Gore-Tex waterproof/breathable insert."

Best for Dexterity: Arc’teryx Fission SV Glove at Amazon

"Has a pre-curved architecture that mirrors the contours of your hand."

Best for Extreme Cold: Outdoor Research Lucent Heated Sensor Glove at Amazon

"Ramp up the heat by toggling on the electronic heat feature."

Our Top Picks

01 of 09

Best Overall: Dakine Excursion Glove

Equally equipped to handle long days at the resort or even longer days deep in the backcountry, the Excursion Glove from Dakine delivers serious warmth and weather protection. The latter comes from the waterproof/breathable Gore-Tex insert that includes Gore Active technology to keep you comfortable in variable conditions. The palm is constructed of durable water-repellent goat leather, while the rest of the glove’s shell is composed of a four-way stretch soft-shell fabric that’s also been DWR-treated to keep out moisture. Insulation comes from 170 grams of Primaloft gold, with a 360-gram wool blend that adds a cozy feel without killing your dexterity. The Excursion also wins points thanks to its roomy gauntlet-style cuff, which slips over the cuffs of your snowboarding jacket, with an adjustable hook-and-loop closure that cinches down to seal out the elements without restricting movement. Dakine rates these as the warmest gloves they make, but if you run really cold, go for the mitten version, which ups the insulation to 230 grams.

02 of 09

Best Value: Burton Gore-Tex Gloves

Burton Gore-Tex Gloves

Amazon

Waterproof/breathable protection is a no-brainer when it comes to selecting snowboarding gloves. While you can find loads of brands with their own proprietary technology, Burton makes it easy to score the confidence that Gore-Tex provides without shelling out more than $100. This glove also employs Gore Warm technology that keeps things breathable, warm, and dry in even the harshest conditions. That protective membrane combines with Burton’s two-layer fabric outer shell to amp durability and shrug off the most extreme of glove use. The insulation varies in weight throughout the glove to keep you warm without feeling like you’re wearing oven mittens, and the four-way-stretch fleece liner can be removed — to dry them out or wear them solo on warm spring days. Zippered pockets lining the top of each glove let you drop in chemical heaters or vent in cool air when things heat up too much. And they’re also screen-touch friendly thanks to the synthetic leather Screen Grab Toughgrip that covers the entire palm.

03 of 09

Best Three-Finger Glove: Flylow Maine Line Glove

The Flylow Maine Line glove splits the difference between the dexterity of a five-fingered glove and the warmth of a standard mitten by splitting out your index finger while nesting the rest of your fingers in insulating warmth. The pre-treated pigskin leather keeps things dry and delivers a heritage-inspired look that echoes the no-frills utility of a leather work glove. Flylow also includes a packet of Nikewax to let you re-waterproof them after a few rugged seasons of use and abuse. Rather than a gauntlet cuff, these snowboard gloves use a stretch of elastic fabric, so it’s best-suited to match up with baggier snowboard jackets with wider Velcro cuffs or when skiing in conditions that don’t collect a lot of loose snow. Synthetic insulation keeps things toasty without overheating.

04 of 09

Best for All Seasons: Helly Hansen Odin Gloves

If you’re yearning for one glove to match all conditions and all temps, from the deep freeze of February to the slushy environs of late spring, the Oden from Helly Hansen has you covered. The two-in-one snowboarding gloves include a removable inner liner that can be worn solo for uphill slogs or when conditions warm up. For less forgiving conditions, the outer shell — made with a polypropylene liner material that’s waterproof and breathable — will block out moisture and wind, and is configured to be worn on their own without sacrificing dexterity, which is ideal for warm and wet conditions. Generous gauntlet cuffs with pull-tab closures let you slip the jacket cuff underneath for bomber protection.

Continue to 5 of 9 below.
05 of 09

Best for Resort Skiing: Obermeyer Guide Glove

The aptly-named Guide Glove from Obermeyer can easily handle the rigors of a resort guide, so it’ll keep the casual resort snowboarder warm, dry, and ready for the next lift ride. Inter-finger stretch panels provide exceptional grip, a comfortable fit that’s enhanced by a waterproof/breathable nylon elastane outer shell that shrugs off moisture, regulates the internal temp, and stretches with each fist flex. Primaloft Gold has been layered throughout the snowboarding gloves for warmth, with 170 grams on the back of the hand, and 115 grams on the palm, along with a fleece-lined interior that’s as plush as a down comforter. The ergonomic pre-curved fit partners with full-grain leather in the palms for assured grip, and an over-the-cuff style makes it easy to lock out the cold, with a wrist-cinch adjustment as well as pull tabs. They even come with leashes, or straps that wrap around your wrists so you can take them off and not worry about accidentally dropping them off the chair lift.

06 of 09

Best for Women: Oros Endeavour Mittens

Oros Endeavour

 Courtesy of Oros

For female snowboarders, the Oros Endeavour offers enough warmth to support circulation. The mittens use Solarcore — the same space-aged tech used by NASA to insulate the space shuttle in the unforgiving cold — to deliver serious warmth, with more insulation-to-weight than goose down or synthetics. The inside liner on these mitten-style gloves has separate channels for each finger, which really packs in the heat. The outer shell is a combo of waterproof nylon and polyester, durable and dexterous leather, and a touch of elastane for four-way stretch. A waterproof zipper runs the length of the top, so you can drop in warmers to really up the thermostat, while a Velcro wrist strap promises a snug-but-not-tight fit. Even the cuffs come with a bonus: they have an elastic inner cuff that stretches over your wrists and a small gauntlet-style configuration to let you slip the jacket cuffs in between those layers.

07 of 09

Best for Kids: Gordini Jr Gore-Tex IV Gloves

Nothing ruins a day on the slopes than soaking-wet hands. Gordini’s Jr Gore-Tex IV will help kids avoid that scenario thanks to the Gore-Tex waterproof/breathable insert. That partners with a fabric outer shell to block the wind and snow, with Megalift synthetic insulation layered throughout to keep things warm and comfortable. The plush lining wicks moisture to further enhance performance and avoid clamminess. Cinches at the wrist tie the snowboarding glove to the wearer, with a grippy textured palm and generous gauntlet cuffs with drawcord closures. 

08 of 09

Best for Dexterity: Arc’teryx Fission SV Glove

The warmest glove in Arc’teryx’s line, the Fission SV delivers serious insulation via layers of Primaloft Silver and Gold along with an Octa Loft breathable insulated lining that wicks sweat to optimize comfort in any scenario — from hard uphill climbs to cold descents. A waterproof, wind-proof, and breathable Gore-Tex insert seals out the elements, while a waterproof insulated outer layer will keep you warm and dry in even the most extreme conditions. Despite all that oven-like warmth, they’re shockingly dexterous, with a pre-curved architecture that mirrors the contours of your hand. A double layer of high-end goat leather gives the snowboarding gloves sure grip and durability, while a pull tab at the gauntlet marries the Fission SV’s with any sort of snowboard jacket. But it’s the little things that help justify the higher-end price tag, including tiny loops at each ring finger to let you clip the gloves to a carabiner and an elastic wrist strap to deliver a precise fit.  

Continue to 9 of 9 below.
09 of 09

Best for Extreme Cold: Outdoor Research Lucent Heated Sensor Glove

When just insulation won’t cut it, you can literally ramp up the heat inside the Lucent Heated Sensor Mitts by toggling on the electronic heat feature. Select low, high, or medium heat levels via the wired control and the warmth is generated throughout the snowboard glove via a body-mapped network of heated wires. You get eight hours of reliable warmth on low, and 2.5 hours on high, and the gloves come with zippered compartments at the cuff to accommodate backup batteries. The Lucent also comes with Enduraloft insulation made of 333 grams of polyester on the back of the hand, with 133 grams covering the palm, and gauntlet-style cuff. The insides feel plush thanks to Moonlight Pile Fleece on the palm and a tri-cot lining at the back of the hand. A Gore-Tex insert delivers weather protection while also allowing your hands to breathe, while the goat leather palm benefits from the pre-curved construction for assured grip and dexterity. And, new to this year’s edition, the thumb is covered with touchscreen-friendly leather.

Our Process

Our writers spent 35 hours researching and testing the most popular snowboard gloves on the market. Before making their final recommendations, they considered 9 different snowboard gloves overall, screened options from 3 different brands and manufacturers, and read over 12 user reviews (both positive and negative). All of this research adds up to recommendations you can trust.

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