The Best Snowboard Bindings for Cruising the Slopes

This season's top snowboard bindings for every type of rider

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The Rundown

Best Overall: Ride A-10 Snowboard Binding at Amazon

“The Cadillac of Ride’s binding line, the A-10 is the stiffest and most high-performing option.”

Best Budget: Salomon Rhythm at Backcountry

“Packs in the features without the higher price tag.”

Best All-Mountain: Bent Metal Axtion Snowboard Binding at Backcountry

“For a snowboard binding that can handle groomers, powder, glades, and the park, look no further.”

Best Park: Rome Cleaver Snowboard Binding at Backcountry

“Your boots will fit snug inside expandable and durable ankle and toe straps with small hinges that provide a locked-in grip.”

Best Halfpipe: Burton Freestyle Re:Flex at Backcountry

“This playful set-up delivers smooth, consistent flex to add forgiveness on rough landings.”

Best Backcountry: Union Strata Snowboard Binding at Backcountry

“A freestyle-centric suite of features to help you edge confidently and surf in the deepest of white.”

Best for Kids: Nitro Charger Mini at Amazon

“Ideal for hard-charging young riders who favor comfort over response.” 

Best for Beginners: Arbor Spruce at Evo

“A unified, forgiving flex focused on helping first-timers quickly progress in the sport.”

Best Women-Specific: Burton Lexa X Re:Flex at Backcountry

“The single-component base plate provides consistent, playful response on any terrain.”

Best for Powder: Jones Apollo at Evo

“These bindings have been designed expressly for expert free-riders who require superior edge control, response, and unmatched comfort.”

Your bindings are effectively the handshake between your boots and snowboard—the piece of gear that allows your instinctive moves to translate to the board literally strapped to your feet. So there’s no way to overstate that finding the right pair of bindings shouldn't be an afterthought.

The best bindings will flex the same as your boots and board, providing a cohesive package that adds forgiveness and agile control on the snow. Some dial the tech to let you excel at particular types of riding, from the park to the pipes to deep powder. Others come with easy-to-adjust customization features that help you dial the optimal, secure fit for the type of riding to which you aspire, even if those aspirations change from day to day.

These are the best snowboarding bindings for the 2021-2022 season.

Best Overall: Ride A-10 Snowboard Bindings

Ride A-10 Mens Snowboard Bindings

Courtesy of Amazon

What We Like
  • Serious performance

  • Versatile

What We Don't Like
  • Pricey

  • Quite stiff—but you can go with more flex by exploring the rest of Ride’s binding line

The Cadillac of Ride’s binding line, the A-10 is the stiffest and most high-performing option, focused on helping intrepid snowboarders level up quickly. The binding boasts a smaller A-Series aluminum chassis to accommodate riders of all sizes, providing reactive flex and power transfer with less rigidity than Ride’s earlier models. Ride's Carbon Slimeback high back marries the response of carbon fiber with the dampening effects of urethane. And the fit will provide comfort for hours on end, with two different-density plastics in the three-piece ankle straps that also improve the durability and performance. Better yet, it includes aluminum and composite mount discs—use the former for a more aggressive ride, or get a bit of extra flex underfoot with the latter. But if the A-10 feels like overkill, Ride’s binding designation—A and C and a sequence of numbers for each from one to ten—make it easy to find the optimal binding for your set-up and price point.

Ability Level: Advanced to expert | Flex: 10/10

Best Budget: Salomon Rhythm Unisex Snowboard Bindings

Salomon Rhythm Unisex Snowboard Bindings

Courtesy of Backcountry

What We Like
  • Inexpensive

  • Comes in seven colors

What We Don't Like
  • Demanding snowboarders may want a stiffer, more responsive set

Built with progression in mind, the Rhythm binding from Salomon packs in the features without the higher price tag. The unisex set-up utilizes an asymmetrical high back to increase the support on the outside and ample flex on the inside, removing any worries about pressure points. The strap configuration can be quickly adjusted to accommodate a forward lean or a micro-max strap configuration—without tools. Either way, the 3D Supreme strap construction provides a soft, padded boot attachment, and an EVA footbed helps dampen chatter to fend off foot fatigue.

Ability Level: Beginner to intermediate | Flex: 1/10

Best All-Mountain: Bent Metal Axtion Snowboard Binding

Bent Metal Axtion Snowboard Binding

Courtesy of Backcountry

What We Like
  • Capable of handling any sort of terrain

What We Don't Like
  • Hard-charging riders may want something that’s a bit stiffer

For a snowboard binding that can handle groomers, powder, glades, and the park, look no further than the Bent Metal Axtion. The even-flex bindings offer a smooth ride in nearly all conditions thanks to a polymer baseplate and highback that's married with EVA padding. Bent Metal claims a responsive ankle strap and asymmetrical highback cups boost the maneuverability transfer while reducing leg fatigue. A chatter-absorbing uni-body chassis also helps smooth out the ride.

Ability Level: Beginner to Advanced | Flex: 6/10

Best Park: Rome Cleaver Snowboard Binding

Rome Cleaver Snowboard Binding

Courtesy of Backcountry

What We Like
  • Highly customizable to cater to how—and where—you ride

What We Don't Like
  •  Pricey

The Cleaver binding from Rome provides a relatively stiff experience to improve the precise navigation required for park riding. The “FullWrap” platform adds a durable chassis that’s focused on pure power and max energy transfer, along with PivotMount Max, a tech system that lets you make small adjustments to the position of their angle straps—go higher for more power and turn initiation, or lower for a surfy, agile ride. The highbacks are also customizable, with canting to adjust the angle of the high back to mirror the lower leg and rotation to position the heelside edge for increased power transfer. Whichever configuration you choose, your boots will fit snug inside an expandable, durable ankle and toe straps with small hinges that provide a locked-in grip.

Ability Level: Intermediate to Expert | Flex: 8/10

Best Halfpipe: Burton Freestyle Re:Flex Snowboard Binding

Burton Freestyle RE:Flex Snowboard Binding

Courtesy of Backcountry

What We Like
  • Inexpensive

  • Ample flex without sacrificing energy transfer

What We Don't Like
  • Not very customizable

Responsiveness and flex are the key features in bindings that target pipe-riding, and the Freestyle Re:Flex from Burton delivers both in spades. This playful set-up delivers smooth, consistent flex to add forgiveness on rough landings, along with a single-component baseplate construction that’s agile and lightweight, so you can carve confidently and target your line on the icy hardpack. Wide-open ankle straps make strapping in a breeze, with a minimized overall construction to improve response and a toe strap that wraps over the boot’s toe box. A MicroFLAD system utilizes a lever and sliding plate to set the forward lean angle of the single-piece high back. And hard landings are smoothed out thanks to Burton’s Re:Flex FullBED cushioning system underfoot. They also employ the brand’s Re:Flex baseplate, which is compatible with all major mountain systems.

Ability Level: Beginner to Intermediate | Flex: 2/10

Best Backcountry: Union Strata Snowboard Binding

Union Strata Snowboard Binding

Courtesy of Backcountry

What We Like
  • Suitable for all riding styles

What We Don't Like
  • A conspicuous lack of customizable options

Suitable for pretty much any riding style, the Strata bindings from Union really excel in the deep snow of the backcountry, affording a freestyle-centric suite of features to help you edge confidently and surf in the deepest of white. A mid-level flex provides the right balance of forgiving support, with layers of EVA and a fused Vaporlite construction to cut vibrations as you encounter rough terrain. The extruded 3D aluminum heel cup partners with a Duraflex ST to improve agility, and bomber materials for the ankle and toe straps add durability for seasons of rigorous use.

Ability Level: Intermediate to expert | Flex: 6/10

Best for Kids: Nitro Charger Mini Snowboard Binding

Nitro Charger Mini Snowboard Binding

Courtesy of Amazon

What We Like
  • Versatile

What We Don't Like
  • Only comes in black

The Charger Mini bindings from Nitro are designed to grow with your ever-increasing boot size, ideal for hard-charging young riders who favor comfort over response. The older sibling to the Charger Micro, the padded, slim-fitting Perfect FIT ankle straps and convertible toe straps have been engineered to provide the optimal fit and agility as the young rider progresses in the sport. A size-adjustable footbed increases the customization, and new EVA dampening technology fends off chatter for confident edging. And when you’re ready to graduate into a bigger binding, you can simply upgrade to the standard Charger binding, so you don’t lose any of the performance and feel you've learned while riding on the Minis.

Ability Level: Beginner to intermediate | Flex: 3/10.

Best for Beginners: Arbor Spruce Snowboard Bindings

Arbor Spruce Snowboard Bindings

Courtesy of Evo

What We Like
  • Easy to use

  • Inexpensive

What We Don't Like
  • No color variations

Arbor emphasizes the playful nature of snowboarding with their Spruce bindings, with a lightweight, single-molded base plate and heel cup for a unified, forgiving flex focused on helping first-timers quickly progress in the sport. A canted EVA footbed works with the ergonomic-pre-curved ankle strap to amp the comfort. Meanwhile, the toe and ankle straps are bow-shaped to keep the foot tray clear for easy entry—a no-fuss, feel-good option with easy-to-operate straps and none of the fancier bells and whistles that a first-timer wouldn’t actually need.

Ability Level: Beginner | Flex: 4/10

Best Women-Specific: Burton Lexa X Re:Flex Snowboard Binding

Burton Lexa X Re:Flex Snowboard Binding

Courtesy of Backcountry

What We Like
  • Lightweight

  • Comfortable

  • Performant

What We Don't Like
  • A bit stiffer than some other bindings

The first thing female riders will notice—and love—about the Lexa X Re:Flex bindings from Burton is the ease of use. The “Double Take” buckles engage quickly and only take a few cranks to tighten the straps. Then they’ll likely be blissed by the bindings’ comfort, thanks to the Re:Flex FullBED cushioning system that includes gel support and to minimize fatigue. But they’ll really appreciate how solidly the Lexa X performs. The single-component base plate provides consistent, playful response on any terrain, the mountain system improves board flex while slicing the ounces, and a Heel Hammock high back uses reinforced rubbery material that wraps around the boot heel for complete suspension to deliver intuitive, agile control. And the rotating dial lets you quickly make tool-free adjustments to the lean angle and rotation of the high back.

 Ability Level: Intermediate to Expert | Flex: 7/10

Best for Powder: Jones Apollo Snowboard Bindings

Jones Apollo Snowboard Bindings

Courtesy of Evo

What We Like
  • Serious performance

  • The ability to adjust the stiffness rating

  • Pricey

  • May be too stiff for some riders

If you’ve ever witnessed pro rider Jeremy Jones carve his way down a crazy-steep snow-covered mountain face, you've seen snowboarding poetry in motion. So those seeking out the deepest snow should take comfort that the Apollo bindings from Jones’ company will work reliably in any circumstance. These bindings have been designed expressly for expert free-riders who require superior edge control, response, and unmatched comfort for day-long aggressive charging. The Flax Carbon high back features a wider upper section that locks in your boot top on toe-side turns, along with Skate Tech technology that provides the ultimate in response.  And you can also adjust the flex settings on the fly—choose from Surf mode when things get playful or the more rigid Freeride mode to max out control. The bindings can accommodate high-volume boots and an expanded footprint delivers solid energy transfer.

 Ability Level: Expert | Flex: 7 or 10/10

Final Verdict

The unisex A-10 from Ride (view at Amazon) targets expert riders who demand top performance and response in a pair of bindings. It uses a smaller A-Series aluminum chassis to accommodate a variety of boot sizes and comes with aluminum and composite mount discs to accommodate either a more aggressive ride or extra flex to dampen its 10/10 rating. But if that’s too burly a binding, consider the all-mountain Bent Metal Axtion (view at Backcountry), which boasts a middle-range flex and layers of EVA in the footbed to cut chatter and promote day-long comfort.

What to Look for When Shopping for Snowboard Bindings

Flex

This term refers to how forgiving the bindings are when put under pressure, measured on a scale from one to ten, with ten being the stiffest. The more flex, the more give you’ll get. The best strategy is to match the flex rating of your binding to that of your snowboard and boot so that you have a consistent package. Beginners and freestyle riders typically want more flex for a more forgiving ride, while all-mountain riders can vary their flex based on how they ride—soft to medium for most situations, but stiff if you’re racing. Stiffer bindings also work a bit better in backcountry and powder, allowing more control over the boards, which are often wider and longer than resort- or park-specific rides.

Style

Strap-in bindings are the most common—you step into the high back (the point in the binding that marries the heel and Achilles of your boot) and the toe cap, clip in the toe and ankle straps, then ratchet them tight to secure you to the board. There are loads of variations in how the straps work, but most can be handled pretty easily while wearing gloves. Speed-entry bindings do make it easier to get in and out of them by reclining the high back so you step into the binding, stabilizing you to the board with a yoke system. They’re more convenient, but also heavier and you do sacrifice a bit of control. Step-in bindings up the convenience level even more—as the name states, you “step into” the binding and then secure the board via clips to your boot. In most instances, step-ins require you to also have a step-in boot, typically from the same manufacturer. 

Sizing and Fit

Naturally, the binding needs to work with your snowboard boot. The optimal fit will deliver a snug, secure attachment, with even pressure and no pinch points. The bindings should also allow your boots to flex, which is why you should go with the same stiffness when selecting the bindings and boots. 

Board Compatibility 

Most boards these days are compatible with most bindings, with bolt patterns on the boards that are either at 2 x 2 or 4 x 4 centimeters, though Burton’s 3D rides have a diamond pattern, and some boards deploy a channel architecture to attach the binding to the board. Always assure that your board is compatible with your specific binding.

Frequently Asked Questions
  • How do I know what type of bindings are right for me?

    Start with the flex rating of both your boots and board, and look for bindings that mirror that number, so that your entire package will be geared toward a complimentary experience. Also, make sure that the binding mounting system is compatible with your board. Then narrow down options further by considering where you want to ride—all-mountain, backcountry, and deep powder benefit from a stiffer set-up, while resort riding and park and halfpipe snowboarders benefit from bindings that prove a bit more comfort and flex. Customizable bindings also let you play on different terrain, though they tend to be more expensive.

  • How do I personalize/customize my bindings for me?

    Some bindings are straightforward, targeting the key features needed for most riders. But others offer an array of tech that lets you customize how the binding performs and fits based on how—and where—you snowboard. Some provide multiple discs to adjust the bindings’ stiffness or the ability to change where the ankle straps cut across your boots for more agility or a surfy feel. Some also allow you to adjust both the angle and position of the high backs to align with your stance and riding style. These adjustment systems may require a tool to make the changes, while others can be handled on the fly. If you like to ride in a variety of different situations—freestyle, powder, glades, groomers, and hard pack—customizable bindings add a nice layer of transforming a simple binding into a quiver of variations that can be tailored to the circumstance.

  • Can I install my bindings on my own?

    If you have a clear understanding of your typical riding stance, you could install them on your own. But unless you have experience in mounting bindings, we vote to leave it the pros—the perfect binding set-up is the only way you can get the board to do what you want. So the room for error should be reduced as much as possible.

Why Trust TripSavvy?

Nathan Borchelt has been testing, rating, and reviewing outdoor and travel products for decades. In addition to reviewing both professional and amateur reviews of each product, price, durability, performance, and levels of customization all came into play.

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