Best Ski Resorts Near Salt Lake City

Solitude Mountain's pristine snow and uncrowded conditions make it our top pick

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Pillows of snow at Deer Valley Resort
Tom Kelly Photo/Getty Images

One of Salt Lake City’s best assets — its ski resorts — can be previewed from downtown. Mesmerizing mountain views surround the city, and for Salt Lakers, the chance to ski many of those mountains is just a quick drive away. Lots of people visit or even move to Utah’s capital for what seems like the region’s endless fresh powder and some of the most favorable skiing conditions you can find in the U.S. 

Travelers to Salt Lake City can strap on their ski boots at many spectacular resorts within a two-hour drive. Whether you’re seeking varied terrain, experts-only mountains, or snowboard-friendly slopes, here are the Salt Lake City area’s best ski resorts.

Best Ski Resorts Near Salt Lake City

Best Overall: Solitude Mountain Resort

Solitude Ski Mountain Resort Winter Village
Courtesy of Solitude Mountain Resort

Why We Chose It

Easy access from Salt Lake City and incredible snow conditions make this resort our top choice.

Notable Amenities

Nordic and snowshoe center, spa, yurt restaurant

Pros
  • Public transportation from Salt Lake City


  • Excellent snow quality


  • Noteworthy off-piste terrain

Cons
  • No sledding/tubing area

Overview

Solitude, in Big Cottonwood Canyon, lives up to its name with uncrowded conditions and untracked powder, especially in its superb Honeycomb Canyon. Like Brighton, another Big Cottonwood resort, it supplies a good mix of beginner, intermediate, and advanced terrain for skiers and boarders of all levels. Solitude also provides cross-country skiers and snowshoers with 12.5 miles of groomed trails that venture into some of Utah’s most stunning and isolated terrain. Lessons are available for those who have never cross-country skied or snowshoed before.

 Solitude’s dining options are the perfect way to warm up after taking off your skis. Guests love the curry fries and panoramic views at Roundhouse and the Liège-style waffles with hot chocolate at Little Dollie Waffles. The Yurt, reached via a moonlit snowshoe tour from Solitude Village, provides an unforgettable five-course dining experience.

Best for Families: Park City

Skiing the Canyons at Park City.
Cheyenne Rouse/Getty Images

Why We Chose It

Varied terrain, a walkable Western town, and a friendly attitude toward kids make this a great resort for families.

Notable Amenities

Sleigh rides, zip line, spa, climbing wall

Pros
  • Generally good for spring skiing 

  • Lots of expert terrain

  • Accessible with an Epic Pass

Cons
  • Busy, especially on holidays and weekends

  • Expensive rooms

Overview

Featuring 7,300 glistening acres of skiable terrain, sleigh rides, and fascinating historical tours, Park City offers endless adventures for all types of winter travelers. It’s also located just 32 miles east of Salt Lake City, making it a fantastic destination for some family fun, like ice-skating or visiting Utah Olympic Park. The resort offers six lodging options that range in character from elegant slope-side luxury to classic mountain cabin. White Pine Canyon Ranch is a family favorite thanks to its spacious suites, outdoor hot tub, fire pit, and sprawling backyard patio. 

With a staggering 330-plus trails, 3,200-foot vertical drop, and six terrain parks, Park City offers plenty of variety for skiers of all levels. You can improve your skills by enrolling in a specialty program, such as the five-day Ski College. For some casual fun, take a tour to learn how Park City evolved from its humble beginnings as a silver mining camp (mining structures are still visible throughout the mountain) into a globally recognized winter sports destination.

Best Luxury: Deer Valley

Pillows of snow at Deer Valley Resort
Tom Kelly Photo/Getty Images

Why We Chose It

Deer Valley’s picture-perfect slopes are a paradise for skiers who prefer to avoid snowboarders, as snowboarding isn’t permitted at the resort. 

Notable Amenities

Ski-in, ski-out lodging; fireplaces; snow globe dining

Pros
  • Friendly lifties and mountain staff

  • Quality on-mountain dining

Cons
  • Exorbitant in-season rates

  • Few trails open early in the season

Overview

Deer Valley pours first-class service into every guest’s stay. With 103 runs winding through 2,026 acres in the Wasatch Mountains, and ski lifts that can accommodate over 51,000 visitors per hour, the resort aims to provide the most fun and action-packed ski experience in Utah. Activities range from freestyle championships and one-on-one skiing experiences with Olympic athletes to mountain tours and on-mountain ski photography so your memories last a lifetime.

Heated sidewalks will keep you warm on your way to roomy accommodations at Stein Eriksen Lodge. Jetted tubs come standard and some rooms have fireplaces and hot tubs. The on-site spa is a highlight, with heated outdoor pools, hot tubs, indoor plunge pools, steam rooms, beauty salons, and speciality rooms. Indulge in delicious and inventive cuisine at Deer Valley’s several restaurants. For something truly refined, visit the St. Regis Deer Valley, where world-class sommeliers are available to assist with wine pairings from a collection of more than 10,000 bottles.

Best for Expert Skiers: Alta

Alta Lodge

Courtesy of Alta Lodge

Overview

Alta has plenty to offer skiers of all levels, but its advanced terrain — over half of the area’s slopes — makes it a particularly exciting destination for expert skiers. With an average of 545 inches of snowfall annually, a vertical drop of 2,538 feet, and 119 runs, Alta offers some of the region’s most thrilling opportunities to carve your way down the slopes. Highlights include interconnected ski tours through as many as six resorts, custom-guided ski touring and mountaineering trips, and even helicopter skiing out of Little Cottonwood Canyon.

Classic mountain luxury is on offer at Snowpine Lodge, where a heated pool, scenic views, and delicious cuisine await. Book a massage or stretch out in a complimentary yoga class before taking advantage of ski-in, ski-out access to the best trails. The lodge’s high-end experiences continue with a game room, full-service ski shop, and a rejuvenating spa with indoor grotto

Best Budget: Brighton

A man does a backflip off a jump in the Brighton Utah backcountry.
Mike Schirf/Getty Images

Why We Chose It

A decent selection of dining options, good rates, and special discounts make Brighton a great option for an affordable ski vacation.

Notable Amenities

Night skiing, terrain parks, snow sports school

Pros
  • Excellent natural snow

  • Good value 

  • Off-piste skiing

Cons
  • Staff not as friendly as other resorts

  • Long lines

  • Limited après-ski scene

Overview

Nestled at the top of Big Cottonwood Canyon, Brighton Mountain boasts 500 inches of annual snowfall, 66 runs, a vertical drop of 1,875 feet, and five high-speed quad lifts. These stats make Brighton an exciting destination for any winter sports enthusiast, but its numerous lodging and activity promotions make it a particularly good option for those seeking a ski vacation on a budget. Take advantage of military discounts, season passholder discounts, and free skiing for two kids under 6 years old with a paying adult. Accommodations run as little as $89 per night at the slope-side Brighton Lodge, where simple comforts can be enjoyed in a cozy, rustic setting.

There are plentiful dining options on site, from a full-service bar and grill at Molly Greens to hot coffee and pastries at the Blind Miner. If you’re really looking to limit expenses, Milly Chalet, at the base of Millicent Lift, has a comfortable patio specifically designated for chowing down on packed lunches.

Best for Snowboarders: Snowbird

Skiers in Little Cottonwood Canyon, Utah.
Joel Addams/Getty Images

Why We Chose It

Easy access from Salt Lake City and incredible snow conditions make this resort our top choice.

Notable amenities

Nordic and snowshoe center, spa, yurt restaurant

Pros
  • Public transportation from Salt Lake City

  • Excellent snow quality

  • Noteworthy off-piste terrain

Cons
  • No sledding/tubing area

Overview

Solitude, in Big Cottonwood Canyon, lives up to its name with uncrowded conditions and untracked powder, especially in its superb Honeycomb Canyon. Like Brighton, another Big Cottonwood resort, it supplies a good mix of beginner, intermediate, and advanced terrain for skiers and boarders of all levels. Solitude also provides cross-country skiers and snowshoers with 12.5 miles of groomed trails that venture into some of Utah’s most stunning and isolated terrain. Lessons are available for those who have never cross-country skied or snowshoed before.

 Solitude’s dining options are the perfect way to warm up after taking off your skis. Guests love the curry fries and panoramic views at Roundhouse and the Liège-style waffles with hot chocolate at Little Dollie Waffles. The Yurt, reached via a moonlit snowshoe tour from Solitude Village, provides an unforgettable five-course dining experience.

Best for All Types of Skiers: Powder Mountain

A person skiing down Powder Mountain

Courtesy of Visit Ogden

Why We Chose It

With some 8,500 acres of skiable terrain, Powder Mountain offers slopes for every type of skier, and the conditions make it ideal for learning to ski powder.

Notable Amenities

Unrivaled ski-in, ski-out lodging; hot tubs in some rooms

Pros
  • Virtually no lift lines

  • Mountain access via snowcat

  • Plenty of lodging options for every budget

Cons
  • Lifts are slow

  • No on-site childcare services

Overview

Ditch the crowds this winter and hit the slopes at Powder Mountain, North America’s largest ski resort. With 8,500 acres of skiable terrain, 154 runs, and over 500 inches of snowfall annually, Powder Mountain's stats alone make it a skiing and snowboarding paradise, but these numbers only begin to tell the story of what makes it so special. With a daily lift ticket cap of 1,500, Powder Mountain ensures that even when the mountain is sold out, visitors still have plenty of space. Suited to beginners and experts alike, the resort features a wide range of challenging runs, plus private lessons for beginners aged 3 and up. Convenient ski-in, ski-out lodging and no lines at the lifts ensure quick access to the powder.

Horizon 7845 is a newly constructed luxury cabin with vaulted ceilings, stylish furnishings, and a large open living space. Its picture windows provide 180-degree views of the Wasatch Mountains and Salt Lake Valley. Other options include the high-end Cascade Townhomes, which can sleep up to 15, and the Spring Park mountain home, which offers three bedrooms, a rooftop hot tub, and chic designer furniture.

Final Verdict

Less than a 45-minute drive from downtown Salt Lake City and the airport, Solitude Mountain Resort is our favorite for skiing in the Salt Lake City region. Its location in Cottonwood Canyon makes it a sure bet for skiing conditions, which is helpful if you’re looking to book your trip far in advance. Popular with locals for its thin crowds and absence of lift lines, the mountain also boasts diverse terrain, including plenty of expert and off-piste skiing. A star spa is also a wonderful amenity to have nearby if you’re traveling with a family member or friend who would rather stay off the mountain. The Ikon Pass allows pass holders unlimited access to Solitude, as well as Deer Valley, Brighton, Alta, and Snowbird, with or without blackout dates depending on the specific pass.

Methodology

We evaluated more than 30 ski resorts during winter visits to the Salt Lake City region before choosing the ones on this list. We considered elements like the resort's reputation, customer reviews, terrain, and difficulty level. We also looked at the quality of available lodging and amenities like pools, restaurants, spas, fitness centers, and travel packages. Though skiing and snowboarding are the resorts’ signature activities, we also evaluated resorts based on their other available winter sports options. Finally, we took into account whether resorts had undergone recent renovations and whether they’d received recent awards or other accolades.

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