The 10 Best Polarized Sunglasses of 2022

Protect your eyes with these crisp, high-contrast polarized sunglasses

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The Rundown

Best Overall: Ray-Ban Hexagonal Flat Lenses at Sunglass Hut

"These shades earn the top spot for their chic design, durability, and UV protection. "

Best Budget: Huckberry Weekenders at Huckberry

"This budget pick has full eye coverage and does a great job of reducing eye strain, glare, and reflection."

Best for Men: Ray-Ban New Wayfarer Classic at Amazon

"Ray-Ban Wayfarers are about as iconic as you can get, and the frames flatter almost any face at almost any age."

Best for Women: Zeal Crowley at Amazon

"These cheerful lenses provide 100 percent protection against UVA, UVB, and UVC rays."

Best for Kids: Weefarers Polarized WeeFarers at Amazon

"This pick is impact-resistant and has the highest possible UV protection rating out there, so you know your child is protected."

Best for Fishing: Maui Jim Peahi Polarized Wrap Sunglasses at Maui Jim

"These sunglasses have a wrap fit to keep them from slipping when you’re casting a line or speeding along in the boat."

Best Prescription: Warby Parker Beale at Warby Parker

"These prescription glasses are extremely durable and have great UV protection. "

Best for Skiing: Oakley Holbrook XL at Oakley

"These glasses assist your vision in glare conditions to make navigating the backwoods and off-piste areas easier. "

Best Luxury: TOM FORD Kira Polarized Sunglasses at Neiman Marcus

"A more refined, stylish option if you don't want to look like you're wearing polarized shades."

Best Aviators: Ray-Ban Aviator Classic at Amazon

"These oversized aviators take the company’s original style and give it a modern lift with its playful proportions."

If sunny days come with a high chance of outdoor time, polarized lenses might be a great option for protecting your eyes. Polarized lenses have more contrast and clarity than traditional non-polarized lenses, and they’re great for driving, fishing, or spending time out on the water—and sometimes also on the slopes.

Not all polarized lenses block all UV light, and not all UV-blocking sunglasses are polarized, so be sure to double-check that the polarized sunglasses you have will protect your eyes as well. 

We’ve done the groundwork to round up the top picks out there, from ones with classic style to those that will make the world around you a little brighter. We’ve also picked some that are sport-specific, so your eyes will be protected on the slopes and the water.

Read on for the best polarized sunglasses you can buy today.

Best Overall: Ray-Ban Hexagonal Flat Lenses

Ray-Ban 51mm Polarized Geometric Sunglasses

Courtesy of Nordstrom

What We Like
  • Has UV protection

  • Durable

  • Comes in various colors

What We Don't Like
  • Expensive

While Wayfarers are still high at the top of our list, Ray-Ban’s Hexagonal Flat Lenses caught our eye for delivering the sunglass icon’s legendary quality in a cool, super-stylish hexagonal frame. You can choose from gold, black, bronze-copper, or gunmetal frames and a variety of lens colors. Either way, you’ll look great while keeping your eyes protected and your vision sharp.

Best Budget: Huckberry Weekenders

Huckberry Weekenders
Courtesy of Huckberry.
What We Like
  • Affordable

  • Well fitting

  • Full eye coverage

What We Don't Like
  • Limited color options

These sunglasses are some of the best budget pairs around for guys. It’s a lighter take on the classic Wayfarer frame, and they fit close to the face, so they won’t fall off as you move. They have full eye coverage, and the lenses punch well above their weight when it comes to reducing eye strain, glare, and reflection. 

Best for Men: Ray-Ban New Wayfarer Classic

Ray-Ban New Wayfarer Polarized Sunglasses

Courtesy of Ray-Ban

What We Like
  • Has UV protection

  • Comes in various colors

What We Don't Like
  • Expensive

This classic pair has stood the test of time for a reason. Made in Italy, these modified Wayfarers have a slightly smaller shape and high-performance polarized glasses lenses for a modern, high-tech take on the OG icon. The polarization does a great job of blocking reflected glare so you can go about your day confidently and without the eye strain that comes from dealing with the bright reflections all day.

Best for Women: Zeal Crowley

Zeal Crowley

Courtesy of Zeal Optics

What We Like
  • Has UV protection

  • Plant-based lenses

What We Don't Like
  • Limited color options

These cheerful, poppy sunglasses have a copper polarized lense that the brand says enhances contrast and depth perception and ups the saturation of greens, reds, and blues. But that’s not the coolest thing about these sunglasses: They happen to be made with Ellume polarized lenses—a plant-based product made from castor beans. And did we mention that these come in a range of cool colorways, too?

Best for Kids: WeeFarers Polarized WeeFarers

What We Like
  • Durable

  • Affordable

  • Has UV protection

What We Don't Like
  • Reviewers note they tend to fall

The price tag might seem a little much to spend on a pair of kid’s sunglasses, but these sunglasses are incredibly durable (and super-cute), thanks to a rubber—yes, rubber—frame that mimics the look of a certain iconic pair of shades while functioning at a pretty indestructible level. The polarized lenses are also made to be impact-resistant and come with the highest possible UV protection rating out there, so you know your little one is as protected as can be. 

Best for Fishing: Maui Jim Peahi Polarized Wrap Sunglasses

Maui Jim Peahi Polarized Wrap Sunglasses

Courtesy of Maui Jim

What We Like
  • Well fitting

  • Comes in various colors

What We Don't Like
  • Expensive

These sunglasses have a wrap fit to keep them from slipping when you’re casting a line or speeding along in the boat—and polarization that keeps the glare from the water from reaching your eyes (the most critical job these have). They come in a few colorways, so you have your options from white to tortoiseshell too glossy black, and you can choose the tint on the polarized lenses, too: You can choose between a versatile vanilla tint to a neutral gray that offers super-sharp contrast.

Best Prescription: Warby Parker Beale

Warby Parker Beale Sunglasses

Courtesy of Warby Parker

What We Like
  • Has UV protection

  • Durable

What We Don't Like
  • Limited color options

In super-stylish colorways of classic black, tortoiseshell, or trendy sage green, Warby Parker’s Beale sunglasses are equipped with both your personal prescription and polarization. (All their sunglasses come with polarized lenses, in fact.) The lenses on these chic glasses block 100 percent of UVA and UVB rays and are made from polycarbonate for extreme durability.

Best for Skiing: Oakley Holbrook XL

Oakley Holbrook XL
What We Like
  • Durable

  • Well fitting

What We Don't Like
  • Expensive

Polarized lenses aren’t necessarily the end-all-be-all when it comes to sunglasses for snow: They help reduce eye fatigue by blocking horizontal light, but patches of ice or other kinds of reflective light can still pose some issues. But if you’re a casual skier keen on polarized, Oakley’s Holbrook XL sunglasses are some of the best in the industry—and they’re not too sporty for you to wear off the slopes for some early apres-ski, either.  They also come equipped with the brand’s PRIZM lens technology, which assists your vision in glare conditions to make navigating the backwoods and off-piste areas easier. 

Best Luxury: TOM FORD Kira Polarized Sunglasses

TOM FORD Kira 56mm Polarized Cat Eye Sunglasses

Courtesy of Saks Fifth Avenue

What We Like
  • Has UV protection

  • Stylish

What We Don't Like
  • Expensive

For a bit of glamour, Tom Ford’s sunglasses have the same sophistication as his other accessories (not to mention clothing designs). These cat-eye Kiras are kitted out with polarized lenses to reduce glare when you’re out seeing and being seen—and subtle touches like T-logo hardware at the temples add a final polish to these elegant sunnies.

Best Aviators: Ray-Ban Aviator Classic

Ray-Ban Aviator Classic

 Courtesy of Amazon

What We Like
  • Comes in various colors

  • Durable

What We Don't Like
  • Expensive

An updated take on a classic, these oversized aviators take the company’s original style and give it a modern lift with its playful proportions. Made in Italy, these sunglasses come in various frame and lens colors that are great for everyday wear and a durable metal frame.

Final Verdict

Ray-Bans are legendary for a reason, and their Hexagonal Flat Lenses (view at Nordstrom) get top marks for style and substance. While you might not be taking these on the slopes, they’re great for everyday wear and have the durability and quality to last you years to come.

What to Look for in Polarized Sunglasses

Price

Sunglasses are an everyday staple for many—whether they’re driving, skiing, or just heading for a walk. If you’re a fan of the cost-per-use framework, spending a bit more on a pair of polarized sunglasses that delivers crisp, high contrast vision and looks and fits great might be worth the money for you. But there are plenty of great budget pairs to be found these days, too—just be sure you’re not sacrificing too much on the durability or quality side of things to save money. Cheaper polarized lenses, for example, might not be as clear for things like phone screens as a higher-quality pair).

Lenses 

Polarized lenses are treated with a special film that helps to get rid of glare by letting some (but not all) light stream in—eliminating, for example, reflections from the water. Polarization is different than UV-blocking coating—just because lenses are polarized doesn’t mean they do a great job of blocking UV light. If you’re in the market for a new pair of shades, we recommend looking for sunglasses that specifically say that they block against UV, too. 

Also, consider polycarbonate lenses if there’s an option available: They’re impact-resistant in case you accidentally drop your shades (scratch-resistant coating is a good idea for the same reason, too).

Purpose

Whether you’re wearing polarized sunglasses primarily for skiing or for driving, you’ll want to consider that as you shop for a pair. Polarized sunglasses, partly due to the kinds of lenses they have, are designed to be more suited for some activities than others—those for everyday use, for example, tend to have brown, gray, or green lenses (brown, FYI, could cause a little color distortion).

FAQs

What sunglass shape will fit my face best?

You can use your face shape as a very loose guideline for finding the best shapes for sunglasses. While there aren’t any hard-and-fast rules (or guarantees), these are starting points you can use in your search:

  • Square-shaped face: Look for glasses that are round or oval, wider on the edges of the frames, or with a wider profile (think cat-eye sunglasses).
  • Heart-shaped faces: Think frames that drop below the eyes and are a little wider than your forehead. Aviators and Wayfarers are great starting points.
  • Oval-shaped face: Oval faces should check out a square or rectangular frames for angles that balance out the curves of their faces.
  • Triangle-shaped face: Cat-eye sunglasses are your best friend, but a glam pair of aviators or retro ‘90s D-frames are also great—the proportions act as the mirror image of those of your own face for balance.
  • Round face: Rectangular frames that hit above the cheekbones help to balance out rounder faces.

How should I clean my sunglasses?

If the glasses come from the manufacturer with specific care instructions, always use those. Generally speaking, it’s usually okay to hold them under the tap for a quick warm-water rinse, then (lightly) use a microfiber cloth to dry them.

Are there any downsides to polarized lenses? 

Polarized lenses can be, well, polarizing—some people swear by them, others don’t necessarily love them. While there aren’t any downsides to wearing them per se, some people find it hard to read display panels and other screens. If you’re wearing them for driving, it might be a good idea to take them for a test drive in your driveway to make sure they work for you.

Why Trust TripSavvy? 

TripSavvy writers spend several hours of research on each round-up, including carefully evaluating customer reviews, talking to professionals in the industry, and reading expert blogs. 

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