The 8 Best Luxury Ski Clothing Brands of 2022

Stand out on the slopes with our top pick, Moncler

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Best Luxury Ski Clothing Brands

TripSavvy / Chloe Jeong

TripSavvy's Pick

We love Moncler for its versatile selection of luxury ski clothing. They offer a range of high-quality, fashionable pieces you can wear on the slopes or around town, including ski jackets, scarves, goggles, and gloves. However, check out Holden if you're in the market for something a little more affordable. This California-based brand offers hip choices at a lower price point.

Luxury ski clothing combines the technical aspects of the best sportswear and puts a next-level sheen on it with premium materials, insulation, and eye-catching style to keep you warm during your next ski trip. And if you like to splash out a little more on your ski clothing—or you’re just dreaming of your ski wardrobe when you can next hit the slopes and apres-ski in an Alpine town—there are plenty of iconic companies and design houses ready to outfit you for your next five-star winter holiday.

It’s not just for the lifts and runs, either—ski clothing also encompasses the after-hours socializing and drinking that takes place in resort towns in chalets that turn into buzzy hubs for cocktails and mulled wine after a day in the cold. There are cozy jumpers, sporty trousers, and other essentials for which these designers are also known.

Read on for some of the best luxury ski clothing brands.

The Rundown

Best Overall: Moncler

"Moncler's outerwear combines the best of both worlds: fashion and function."

Best for Extreme Cold: Canada Goose

"If you're heading into the backcountry or taking a long expedition, these jackets are some of the best."

Best Affordable: Holden

"Holden sells beautiful luxury pieces at lower price points."

Best for Après-Ski: Bogner

"This German company's apres-ski wear is the athleisure you'll want to be sporting in cozy Alpine huts."

Best Active: Kjus

"Combines technical performance with next-level design for top-quality pieces that can hold up on the slopes."

Best Alpine Brand: Fusalp

"Created in the heart of the French Alps, Fusalp has been known for stylish pieces since 1952."

Best Runway: Fendi

"Gorgeous quilted ski pants and mink gilets for skiing help you zoom down runs in style."

Best Style: Perfect Moment

"With bold, graphic patterns, Perfect Moment helps you stand out on the slopes."

Best Overall: Moncler

Moncler Lamoura Technical Ski Jacket

 Courtesy of Moncler

What We Like
  • High quality

  • Versatile apparel

  • Durable

What We Don't Like
  • Only sells ski apparel seasonally

  • More fashion-focused than expedition-focused

French ski brands tend to have both performance and style credentials, and Moncler has grown from quilted sleeping bags to equipment powerful enough to help mountaineers summit K2 in 1954. Its durability and quality hold up for those who are looking to make an investment in luxury ski wear for snowy runs, but it’s designed with an eye for fashion, too—these are the jackets you can take from the lift into the chalet (and turn heads doing so).

Beyond coats, there’s a full range of clothing, including ski-inspired jersey and wool dresses, sweaters, and even capes—as well as bags and sneakers, scarves and gloves, and eyewear. If you’re bringing your dog on vacation, Moncler also sells dog coats, so Fido is also Alpine-ready.

Best for Extreme Cold: Canada Goose

Canada Goose Expedition Parka

 Courtesy of Canada Goose

What We Like
  • Tons of coat options

  • Versatile apparel

  • Arctic appropriate

What We Don't Like
  • Few snow pants options

  • Real fur

Canada Goose has built its reputation on Arctic-ready performance wear for extreme cold, and some of the worst inclement weather nature can throw your way. One of its most iconic pieces, the Expedition Parka, was developed for scientists working at McMurdo Station in Antarctica—and its jackets have been worn on the summit of Everest, too. The company’s parkas remain its most famous products, but it also makes durable snow pants and all the accessories you’d need, like hats and gloves. While Canada Goose gear might be way more than you need for a ski trip to the groomed slopes of the Alps, if you’re heading into serious backcountry or undertaking a long expedition, these jackets are some of the best.

Best Affordable: Holden

Holden Down Joggers

 Courtesy of Holden

What We Like
  • Lower price point

  • Versatile apparel

  • Comfortable

What We Don't Like
  • Offers few snow pants

Affordable luxury ski wear is, of course, a different price bracket than “affordable,” but bearing that in mind, Holden sells beautiful luxury pieces at lower price points than many on this list. Whether taking the chairlift or heading to the bar, its pieces appeal to all ski resort goers. Sure, the brand is based in Venice, California, but the founders’ eye for cool snow gear is unmatched (one is snowboarder Mike LeBlanc).

Holden’s hybrid down joggers might be the next best thing to leggings for snowy days, and cropped jackets give ski bibs a super-cool twist for women. Over in the men’s section, side-zip anoraks, fishtail parkas, and three-layer camel-colored ski jackets with matching trousers offer coordinated, thoroughly updated looks for guys.

Best for Après-Ski: Bogner

Bogner Jamy Down Jacket

Courtesy of Bogner

What We Like
  • Practical

  • Comfortable

  • Chic

What We Don't Like
  • Few options out of season

  • More athleisure than arctic

Bogner’s been making incredible ski clothing since 1932, and in true practical German fashion, the gear is some of the best for those spending their days in the powder. In fact, the German company has been the official outfitter of its country’s ski team since 1952. And while Bogner’s technical gear is clearly fantastic for the slopes with those credentials, its apres-ski wear is the kind of athleisure you’ll want to be sporting in cozy Alpine huts or during stretch breaks exploring some of Europe’s chicest resort towns.

Back in the room for a nightcap or more casual resorts, the loungewear section is super-cozy too. The brand also has a line for junior snow bunnies, including ski bibs and quilted ski jackets, though they also carry a luxury price tag.

Best Active: Kjus

Kjus Men's Sight Line Jacket

 Courtesy of Kjus

What We Like
  • All encompassing

  • Durable

  • Athletic

What We Don't Like
  • Understated

Since 2000, Kjus has combined technical performance with next-level design for top-quality pieces that aren’t too precious to let you do your thing on the slopes. You’ll find performance-minded jackets, mid-layers, gloves, and pants for skiing, as well as more lifestyle-minded pieces for days spent wandering around charming Alpine villages. The brand was started by a Norwegian Alpine ski champion, Lasse Kjus, who wanted to prioritize function over fashion for skiing and winter sports by creating beautiful pieces with technical benefits. Now owned by the parent company of Titleist and Footjoy, the brand is based in Boulder with satellite offices in Switzerland. And if you’re also a golfer, they have an excellent collection for men and women on the links.

Best Alpine Brand: Fusalp

Fusalp Paccaly II Shapka

 Courtesy of Fusalp

What We Like
  • Stylish

  • Well-fitting

What We Don't Like
  • More fashionable than functional

  • Expensive

Created in the heart of the French Alps, Fusalp has been known for stylish pieces since 1952, and given that a team of tailors founded it, you can believe that the lines and fit on these are close to impeccable. The French label offers stylish, slim-fitting ski pants available in more technical fabrics and a glam velvet for apres-ski, plus cool metallic bomber jackets and cozy knits for sitting around the fire with spiked cocoa in hand. Their 2020-2021 collaboration with Chloé adds a splash of 1970s styling to the slopes we can’t look away from—especially a retro ski suit in navy, white, and burnt orange. And if you want a stylish ski helmet, look no further—these are some of the coolest out there (the furry mustard mittens and shapkas are on our list, too).

Best Runway: Fendi

Fendi Ski Suit

 Courtesy of Fendi

What We Like
  • Stylish

  • Fits well

  • Versatile

What We Don't Like
  • Seasonal

  • Expensive

Plenty of designers have collections meant for the slopes and the chichi scene in the apres-ski hours, but Fendi is one of the oldest and best. True to form, it's some of the most stylish out there, with pieces like paisley Lycra bodies and leggings, gorgeously quilted ski pants, mink gilets for skiing, and black leather biker boots for the time off-piste.

Fendi's gear isn't just meant to look pretty zooming down the runs or in the chalet; it's performance-minded, too. The company even makes skis, ski helmets, ski suits, jackets, leggings, and sunglasses. Of course, it comes with a runway-level price tag, but if you want Italian luxury and Alpine vibes, Fendi knows precisely what it's doing—and does it well.

Best Style: Perfect Moment

Perfect Moment Women's Ski II Sweater

Courtesy of St. Bernard 

What We Like
  • Youthful

  • More affordable

What We Don't Like
  • Seasonal

  • Very casual

With a younger, more streetwear-inspired take on skiwear, Perfect Moment’s luxury skiwear features graphic black and white patterns, metallic detailing, and star-pattern trim for unserious takes on the usual luxury skiwear. Its ski suits for women are especially cool and play into the current jumpsuit trend by reviving retro-inspired shapes and patterns. For apres-ski, Perfect Moment takes traditional Alpine knitwear designs and blows the graphics up into thoroughly modern takes on classic patterns, with tricolor motifs featuring chevrons, Chamonix silhouettes, and Nordic motifs.

What to Look for in Luxury Ski Wear

Material

When it comes to luxury ski wear, one of the biggest factors is the material it’s made out of. Instead of standard wool, look for cashmere or high-quality baby alpaca wool. The fabric should feel soft against the skin, never scratchy or coarse.

Technical features

More expensive fabrics tend to have more technology built into their engineering or production. Look for lightweight, thin fabrics that deliver superior warmth and water resistance without the bulk and weight or those that do a superior job of wicking away sweat from a good run down the slopes. 

Cost

Luxury isn’t about spending as much money as you can. It’s about investing money wisely in superior quality and performance. Look for the best value in terms of material and use. A lot of luxury ski wear can also be stylish off the slopes, so that versatility should factor into how much you want to invest in your ski wardrobe.

Frequently Asked Questions
  • How do you choose between a one-piece, bib, or ski pants?

    You’ve seen them in classic ski photos and movies, and now more and more luxe brands are making one-piece ski suits trendy again. While a one-piece is an easy way to look streamlined and stylish, you’re locked into that look for the rest of the day. If you like to switch up your outfits or are hoping to wear your suit for the next few years, consider buying individual pieces you can mix and match as trends change.

    If you choose a separate ski top and bottom, the next question is, should you buy a bib or ski pants? Bibs have the advantage of not sliding down as you ski, but they can also be bulkier and harder to manage during bathroom runs. Ideally, you can try on different styles and see what feels best for you.

  • What do you wear for après-ski?

    Any avid skier knows that what you wear to the lodge is as important as what you wear on the slopes. But unless you miraculously live in Aspen, you probably are packing a suitcase for your ski trip and don’t have space for endless outfit options. The key is to bring versatile pieces like graphic bibs, overalls, or joggers that can take you from the slopes to the chalet in style effortlessly.

  • How do you clean your ski clothes?

    You usually don’t have to wash your ski jacket or pants after every ski day, but if they’re starting to look dingy, it’s likely time to freshen up. The first step is to check each item’s label and follow the care instructions. You’ll be surprised how often you can actually wash items at home rather than at the dry cleaners, so check with the brand before making any assumptions. Once you reach the end of the season, it’s best to store your clean gear in garment bags or large plastic containers to protect them from dust and UV light.

Why Trust TripSavvy

Krystin Arneson is a freelance editor and writer based in Berlin, Germany. During the week, you'll find her traveling as often as possible; during the weekend, she serves as editor for Glamour.com. Krystin began writing for TripSavvy in May 2018.

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