The 9 Best Fishing Lines of 2021

Reel in the big ones with these top lines

Our editors independently research, test, and recommend the best products; you can learn more about our review process here. We may receive commissions on purchases made from our chosen links.

TRIPSAVVY-best-fishing-lines

Chloe Jeong / TripSavvy

The Rundown

Best Overall: Seaguar Fluoro Premier Fluorocarbon at Amazon

"Seaguar’s Fluoro Premier Fluorocarbon gives the ambitious angler everything they need to land their prize."

Best Buy: Sufix Elite Monofilament at Amazon

"Keeps things simple—and affordable—with a single-line construction that’s easy to handle."

Best Copolymer: McCoy Premium Copolymer Line—Mean Green at Amazon

"The Premium Copolymer Line does everything that you’d demand from a copolymer line."

Best Fluorocarbon: Berkley Vanish at Amazon

"Designed to be flexible, the Vanish offers a subtle feel, an easy cast, and more accuracy."

Best Braided: Powerpro Spectra Braided Fishing Line at Amazon

"Built to offer a super-thin, super-strong fishing line, the Spectra is your go-to for big-game."

Best Monofilament: Momoi Hi-Catch Diamond Monofilament at Amazon

"Made of HG nylon, this line comes with a treatment that resists UV damage."

Best Floating Fly Line: Rio Gold at Amazon

"Printed line markers make it easy to ID each line, while a front-welded loop allows quick rigging."

Best Sinking Fly Line: Orvis Clearwater Type VI Sink at Amazon

"Boasting a sinking rate of six IPSs, this line will get you fly down under the surface of the water in an instant."

Best Saltwater Fly Line: Scientific Anglers Amplitude Infinity Salt at Amazon

"Witness the Amplitude Infinity Salt, a fly line engineered for all saltwater fly-fishing."

Not all fishing lines are created equal. Indeed, going with a fishing line that doesn’t match your target species or type of angling you enjoy could quickly lead to heart-breaking stories of “the ones that got away” due to a snapped line or a mess of tangles when you try to reel in the fish. From smartly-engineered fly lines to those that are optimal for the windiest, hottest of conditions and the heaviest of fishes—as well as more mellow angling exploits off a pier or at the local fishing hole—these are the best fishing lines.

Best Overall: Seaguar Fluoro Premier Fluorocarbon

Suitable for practically any kind of fishing, and available in salt- and fresh-water versions, Seaguar’s Fluoro Premier Fluorocarbon gives the ambitious angler everything they need to land their prize. The virtually invisible line boasts a smaller diameter than other options, which adds to the overall feel so you can notice subtle line pulls—even if the line is slack. It also comes with a high shock strength and loads of abrasion resistance. Knots are easy to tie securely, and the line has almost no memory, meaning that the 1,000th cast will be just as smooth as the first. Seaguar literally invented fluorocarbon, and it shows. The Fluor Premier comes in test weights from 12 to 80 pounds, and is available in 25- and 50-yard lengths.

Best Buy: Sufix Elite Monofilament

The Sufix Elite Monofilament keeps things simple—and affordable—with a single-line construction that’s easy to handle, tie into secure knots, cast, and reel. Tensile strength is improved with Sufix’s Micro Resin Technology, which also improves abrasion resistance and reinforces light strength. As with most monofilament lines, memory is modest and the line proves to be fairly buoyant, making it optimal for surface lures but perhaps not ideal for bottom-bait fishing. You can choose test weights that range from four to 30 pounds; four- to 20-pound tests come in 330- and 1,000-yard spools, while the 25- and 30-pounds only come in 250 yards. Color options include clear, camo, high-vis neon yellow, and a low-vis green.

Best Copolymer: McCoy Premium Copolymer Line—Mean Green

Built from a proprietary blend of nylon resins and infused with McCoy’s Penesil Saturation Process, the Premium Copolymer Line (in the Mean Green color scheme) does everything that you’d demand from a copolymer line. It has superior knot and tensile strength, proves easier to handle than monofilament lines, and practically no spool memory. All this adds up to longer, smoother casts and nominal water absorption to increase its durability and life. Stretch is also downplayed, with a high level of abrasion resistance. Test strengths range for one to 30 pounds, with lengths that vary by weight, from 125 yards up to 3,000. And that distinctive Mean Green color makes it ideal for locales with heavy weed cover or green-tinted waters.

Best Fluorocarbon: Berkley Vanish

The distinctive element of Berkley’s Vanish fluorocarbon line is baked into the product’s name: it’s practically invisible underwater. Designed to be flexible (rather than displaying the stiffness common to fluorocarbon lines), the Vanish offers a subtle feel, an easy cast, and more accuracy. Strength is robust enough to handle years of use, and the non-absorbing materials means no waterlog. Designed to sink, the Vanish also creates a more sensitive overall feel, from rod tip to lure. The break strength ranges from six to 40 pounds, and spools come in lengths that vary from 110 to 1,700 yards.

Best Braided: Powerpro Spectra Braided Fishing Line

Built to offer a super-thin, super-strong fishing line, the Spectra Braided from Powerpro should be your go-to for big-game fishing. It boasts superior abrasion resistance, no memory at all, and no stretch to provide the precision you desire along with a lower shock strength you need. Built from ultra-strong braided Spectra fiber, the line has been treated with Honeywell’s Enhanced Body Technology to keep things smooth and sensitive. It comes in test weights that go from 5 to 250 pounds, and comes in a host of colors, including moss green, white, red, and high-vis yellow.

Best Monofilament: Momoi Hi-Catch Diamond Monofilament

In many ways, monofilament lines are the prototypical fishing lines. Simple by design, they’re a single thread of plastic that’s stretched out and set in a thin tube, making it inexpensive, reliable, and applicable for most types of fishing. When crafting their limited-edition Hi-Catch Diamond, the Japanese company catered this monofilament specifically to the U.S. market and the ample big-game fishing that happens across its waterways. Made of HG nylon, it comes with a treatment that resists UV damage, with a high abrasion rate, nominal memory, and substantial ease-of-use, from tying knots to unspooling for a long cast. The testing rate is equally flexible, with weights that range from 12 up to 200 pounds. It comes in three colors—clear, brilliant blue, and high-vis fluorescent yellow—and is available in 50-, 1,000-, and 3,000-yard wrist spools.

Best Floating Fly Line: Rio Gold

Already a perennial favorite among trout fly-fishers, Rio updated their Gold line in 2020 by building it with SlickCast—a proprietary coating technology that drastically reduced line friction for the smoothest action possible. The line has a long head and a back taper that provides total control and stability at a distance, with a profile that also encourages close-range angling for casting flies between size #2 and #22. The Gold also boasts the brands own tip coating formula that allows the line to float twice as high as regular lines—without increasing the line diameter. Printed line markers make it easy to ID each line, while a front-welded loop allows quick rigging, partnered with a welded loop at the back to make it even easier to set. A total of 15 versions are available, with colors that range from moss/gold and melon/gray dun to orange and clear. Max length measures out to 90 feet.

Best Sinking Fly Line: Orvis Clearwater Type VI Sink

Boasting a sinking rate of six IPSs, the Clearwater Type VI Sink fishing line from Orvis will get you fly down under the surface of the water and into the strike zone in an instant. Capable of high-end performance in cold to moderate water found in lakes, pods, and deep rivers, the front-welded loop and braided multifilament core make rigging a breeze, with a subtle, responsive feel and purely intuitive accuracy. The tip measures in at 6 inches, with a 5 foot front taper and a 4 inch rear taper. The dark gray line has weights that range from 5 to 8 pounds, and it comes in 90-foot-long spools.

Best Saltwater Fly Line: Scientific Anglers Amplitude Infinity Salt

Staying true to its name, Scientific Anglers packs in a lot of tech features into their wide range of fishing lines. Witness the Amplitude Infinity Salt, a fly line specifically engineered for all saltwater fly-fishing. It features the brand’s AST PLUS slickness additive, which lets you cast farther and longer than other lines while also increasing durability and abrasion resistance. The line also comes with Tropi-Core tech, so that it stays both stiff and slick in hot, humid, tropical environments. A half line weight makes it easy to turn over on windy days, drastically improving control and finesse in a variety of fishing conditions. A small measure of floating “texture” on the front taper keeps the line and lure at the optimal depth, while “shooting texture” (small divots similar to those covering golf balls) runs the length of the belly, rear taper, and running line to reinforce balance and control, with a longer-than-average head length to boost casting accuracy. A high-contrast sighter lets you know when you’re reaching the end of the 100-foot-long line. The weight forward ranges from seven to 12, and is ideal for catching redfish, bonefish, permit, snook and tarpon.

What to Look For in Fishing Lines

The type of fishing you do will largely dictate which line you should consider. Fly-fishing requires a line that comes with a tapered head to add weight to the leader, so you can cast accurately, along with solid abrasion resistance to fend off damage from rocks while still being flexible enough to provide agility. Deep-sea anglers, meanwhile, want a line with serious weight tests to handle big fish, with slightly more stretch and a higher shock strength.

Monofilament lines are the most common and most versatile for most types of fishing. They consist of one piece of plastic that’s stretched and spooled, and boast low memory (letting the line hang straight) and lots of stretch. Coloplymer lines is a step up, typically crafted of two materials to provide even lower stretch and almost no memory.

Braided and fluorocarbon lines up the tech considerably. The former can include as many as four to 16 different strands that have been woven together, amping their durability, and cutting out stretch and memory, while fluorocarbon lines come with a high shock strength and are practically invisible under water.

Be sure to consider the weight of your target fish as all lines carry different limits (typically measured in pounds, with lines capable of handling anything from two pounds up to 200). And lines also vary by color, from camo or deep green to blend in with mossy water to high-vis colors to help keep track on longer casts.

Was this page helpful?
Continue to 5 of 9 below.
Continue to 9 of 9 below.