The 12 Best Camping Coffee Makers of 2022, Tested by TripSavvy

Sea to Summit's X-Brew Collapsible Coffee Maker topped our list

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Best camping coffee makers
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

For many, coffee is a required morning ritual. No doubt, after spending a night in a tent, a warm cup of coffee is an enjoyable and welcoming experience. There are plenty of camp coffee makers available on the market. We researched dozens of them and ultimately picked 18 to test in our testing lab in Brooklyn, New York.

We tested for ease of use, brew quality, portability, durability, and ease of cleanup. Our testers rated each coffee maker based on those attributes. Below are our picks of the best camping coffee makers currently available.

Best Overall: Sea to Summit X-Brew Coffee Dripper

Sea to Summit X-Brew Coffee Drip
TripSavvy / Nick Kova.
What We Like
  • Super ease to use

  • Compact and light

  • Excellent brew quality

  • Simple to clean up and produces minimal waste

What We Don't Like
  • Nothing yet

Although Sea to Summit says the X-Brew Coffee Dripper has enough volume for two cups, most solo campers likely need a quick double-dose of coffee rather than a thimble-sized pour. This collapsible coffee maker pops up when you’re ready to brew, with a reusable stainless-steel double-mesh filter featuring 180-micron holes to strain the grounds thoroughly. You can also swap the reusable filter for a paper version and still get a good tasting cup of coffee—the spiral pattern inside the dome breaks the surface tension of the paper filter to create a more consistent drip speed. It's made from food-grade, heat-resistant, BPA-free silicone and fits on wide-mount water bottles, mugs, and cups.

The X-Brew earned top marks on our lab test. Our testers loved everything about this pour-over coffee maker, from how easy it was to use to the quality of the cup of joe to its ease of cleanup. There was no plastic taste; unlike other coffee makers we tested, there was no burnt smell or taste. "I love that it's collapsible, simple, and efficient," one tester noted. "Everything is reusable, so there is no waste." Thanks to the X-Brew's compact size, light weight, and excellent brew quality, we didn't test a better option.

Capacity: 2 cups | Weight: 3 ounces | Dimensions: Collapses to 20-millimeters

Sea to Summit X-Brew Dripper
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

Best Overall, Runner-Up: Bestargot Titanium Cup Camping Coffee Mug

Bestargot Titanium Coffee Cup
TripSavvy / Nick Kova.
What We Like
  • Excellent brew quality

  • Easy to brew and clean

  • Could double as a way to warm soup while camping

What We Don't Like
  • Could be a bit better in portability, but that's a tiny nitpick

The use of titanium is one of the best relatively recent innovations in camp cookware. It's incredibly durable and lightweight—both essential qualities for any sort of camping gear. Our testers loved the Bestargot Camping Titanium French Press because of those features and its brew quality. This coffee maker is a bit more expensive than the X-Brew above, but if you prefer the French press to pour over, we highly recommend going with the Bestargot coffee maker.

"This cup was bold and deliciously thick," our testers noted of the Bestargot's brew quality. They also liked how simple it was to clean, its lightness, and its functionality. One tester noted it would also double nicely as a way to cook soup. We could also see this doubling as an at-home coffee press. No shame.

Capacity: 3 cups | Weight: 7.5 ounces | Dimensions: 3.94 x 4.33 inches

Bestargot Camping Titanium Coffee Maker
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

Best Budget: Primula Brew Buddy Portable Pour Over

Primula Brew Buddy Portable Pour Over

Courtesy of Amazon

What We Like
  • Extremely compact

  • Intuitive and simple to use

  • Good backpacking option

What We Don't Like
  • Coffee was a bit weak

If you're looking for a solid budget option, or if compactness and weight are more critical than brew quality, the Primula Brew Body is a good pick. Weighing less than 3 ounces and able to pack down small, we envision this as a good option for backpackers or anyone looking to have a quick cup of joe on the go. "It's extremely compact, very intuitive, and simple to use," one tester noted.

The only issue our testers found with the Brew Buddy? The coffee was a bit on the weak side. Our testers theorized this is likely due to the filter's mesh not being as fine as others. The water dripped through quickly and not as evenly as other pour-over options. There was also no steep time. But, if you're looking for a compact, lightweight, and quick coffee option on a budget, the Primula Brew Buddy is our strongest recommendation.

Capacity: 1 cup | Weight: 2.39 ounces | Dimensions: 4.2 x 4.2 x 1.6 inches

Primula Brew Buddy
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

Best for Car Camping: Bialetti Moka Express

Bialetta Moka Express coffee maker
TripSavvy / Nick Kova.
What We Like
  • Coffee tasted great

  • Easy to clean up

  • Best percolator option we tested

What We Don't Like
  • Only works for car camping

There's perhaps nothing more camp coffee stereotypical than setting a percolator on a camp stove or next to the fire. The Bialetti Moka Express is the pick for those looking to realize that idyllic vision. It comes in sizes of one, six, nine, and 12 cups, so you've got the option to pick the best size for your group. The aluminum construction helps save weight, but we envision this being for your car camping or glamping trip.

Our testers were hesitant to recommend this for many camping experiences because it requires medium heat for the best brew quality. That's certainly doable; however, it'd be easier to do on a camp stove rather than a campfire. But moving it further from the campfire could undoubtedly achieve that medium heat. Regardless, our testers loved the brew quality, and like the Bestargot press, we could envision this doubling as an at-home percolator.

Capacity: 1, 6, 9, and 12 cups | Weight: 9 ounces | Packed dimensions: 2.9 x 4.4 x 4.4 inches (1-cup size)

Bialetti Moka Express
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

Best Press: GSI Outdoors 30 FL. OZ. JavaPress

GSI Outdoors JavaPress

Courtesy of Amazon

What We Like
  • Durable, consistent coffee maker

  • Could work for car camping, backpacking, and at home

What We Don't Like
  • Brew quality could be better

Make no mistake—there are fancier camping coffee makers on the market. Still, the JavaPress from GSI Outdoors is one of our favorites due to its ability to make a reliable cup of coffee outdoors. This device resembles your favorite French press coffee maker—toss in ground coffee, add hot water, let it steep, then plunge and pour. But this JavaPress adds a few camp-friendly features that make it ideal for travel applications, including a double-walled insulated lid and a ballistic nylon wrapping that keeps your coffee warm for long periods. The carafe itself is BPA-free, lightweight, and shatter-resistant, making it a great coffee maker for outdoor use, but the patent-pending plunger may inspire you to use the JavaPress at home. It uses a silicone ring to eliminate coffee blow-by (the term for when steeped grounds sneak past the filter when you press down) to deliver flavorful coffee. And if the 30-fluid-ounce capacity feels modest, you can also upgrade to the 50-fluid-ounce model.

Our testers weren't as impressed with the brew quality as other coffee makers we tested, noting the coffee tasted a bit burnt and like plastic. It's also not the easiest to clean while camping as the grounds can get stuck at the bottom. Still, this has been the go-to camping, backpacking, and home coffee maker for us for years, and we've loved its versatility. Pro-tip: Pack items like your coffee or fuel canister inside the press while backpacking to save precious space.

Capacity: 30 ounces (3.75 cups) | Weight: 11 ounces | Packed dimensions: 4.5 x 4.2 x 7.7 inches

GSI Outdoors JavaPress
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

Best Pour Over: MiiR Pourigami

MiiR Pourigami
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.
What We Like
  • Compact and ultra-lightweight

  • Made with medical-grade stainless steel, so very durable

What We Don't Like
  • Coffee was a bit weak

MiiR’s Pourigami will turn heads—even for those who don’t drink coffee. This small single-serve coffee maker only measures 5.5 x 2.75 x 0.75 inches. But don't be fooled by its small size. Crafted of durable 18/8 medical-grade stainless steel, this four-ounce device comprises three interlocking Hardshell powder-coated, BPA-free panels. It's easy to assemble when you're ready to make some pour-over coffee and has machined grooves to ensure the perfect placement over your cup. It stores flat when not in use and comes with a compact storage case. You can use this coffee maker with your filters or opt to buy some made by the brand; either way, the filters can be housed in the included storage case for compact packing.

Our testers loved everything about this pour-over device except the brew quality, noting it was a bit weak. This is also a pricier option. But, if you're a backpacker or looking for a durable and ultra-lightweight option, the MiiR Pourigami is a good pick.

Capacity: 12 ounces | Weight: 4 ounces | Packed dimensions: 5.5 x 2.75 x 0.75 inches

MiiR Pourigami
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

Best for Group Camping: OXO Brew Venture French Press

OXO Brew Venture French Press

Amazon

What We Like
  • Shatter-resistant plastic that's BPA-free

  • Makes good coffee

  • Still lightweight considering its size

What We Don't Like
  • Not the most portable, but that's not surprising considering its size

We recommend the OXO Brew Venture French Press for car camping with a large, coffee-loving group. The Venture uses a shatter-resistant carafe, is relatively lightweight, and brews up to eight cups at once. Bonus: It's BPA-free.

Our testers enjoyed the visibility of the carafe, comfortable handle, and smooth-working plunger, which they said combined to make a great cup of coffee, noting it was rich and bold, typical of a French press. While the press is a bit bulky and doesn't break down, it still weighs less than a pound, which isn't bad for a coffee maker of its capacity.

Capacity: 8 cups | Weight: 15.1 ounces | Packed dimensions: 7 x 7 x 9 inches

OXO Brew Venture Travel French Press
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

Best for Durability: Stanley Boil and Brew French Press

Stanley Boil and Brew French Press

Amazon

What We Like
  • Made great coffee

  • Can be used in other applications

What We Don't Like
  • Heavy, so definitely a car camping option

French presses can easily break while traveling because they're usually made out of glass. Choose the Boil and Brew French Press from Stanley for a press that won't crack in your backpack or car. Made of some of the most durable metal available, you'd have to want to damage this french press to break it. In addition to being very strong, this 32-fluid-ounce press can also be used in other applications, including boiling soups or cooking vegetables. The two handles rotate flat against the canister when not in use, and the vented nylon lid is burn-resistant. Best of all, this french press comes with a lifetime guarantee, so if you manage to damage it, you can get it replaced.

Our testers liked how easy it was to make coffee with this press and the quality of the brew. "The metal naturally insulates the coffee, keeping it at an ideal temperature for great flavor," one tester noted. The size and weight make this a good pick for car camping with little worry if it rolls off a table or out of the car.

Capacity: 6 cups | Weight: 1.3 pounds | Packed dimensions: 8.11 x 4.65 x 8.5 inches

Stanley Adventure All-in-One Boil and Brew French Press
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

Best for Backpacking: AeroPress Coffee and Espresso Maker

4.5
AeroPress-Coffee-and-Espresso-Maker

Courtesy of Amazon

What We Like
  • Great portability

  • Makes three cups of espresso in about a minute

What We Don't Like
  • A lot of parts

The AeroPress is essentially a cult classic among backpackers everywhere. And that's for good reason. It uses patented technology to optimize the contact between water and the surface of the coffee grounds to quickly cut back on brew time while also minimizing acidity in the coffee. It can make up to three cups of espresso in about a minute, and even our resident espresso snob said it'd satisfy "all but the biggest coffee snobs."

At 1 pound, it might be a bit heavy for some ounce-counters. But that weight includes parts that could be left at home, like the stirrer, which your spork or other camp utensils could replace. The ease of cleaning and portability bring the AeroPress home as the best for backpacking.

Capacity: 3 cups | Weight: 1 pound | Packed dimensions: 4.22 x 4.22 x 5.26 inches

AeroPress Coffee and Espresso Maker
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

Best Ultralight: GSI Outdoors Java Drip

GSI Outdoors Java Drip

Amazon

What We Like
  • Incredibly packable and lightweight

  • Decent enough coffee for the backcountry

What We Don't Like
  • Only works if you've got a mug with you

The Java Drip coffee maker from GSI Outdoors weighs a feathery 9 grams (less than 0.4 ounces), humble enough to impress the most obsessive ounce-counting thru-hiker. The nylon filter attaches to your favorite camping mug or cup with three legs. Once it's positioned securely, you need to drop in a #2 or #4 paper filter, add your coffee grounds, and then start pouring in hot water. Users report that the drip speed is steady enough to deliver pure flavor without clogging. And when you’re properly caffeinated, the filter collapses flat to a mere 4.2 x 4.2 x .5 inches, so you don’t sacrifice any packing space for that perfect cup of joe.

So, if the AeroPress isn't for you, consider this your pour-over backpacking option. While our testers thought the brew was weak for their liking, they also thought it'd be good enough for a backcountry cup of joe. "If the mesh was just slightly denser, I think it would have made an excellent brew," concluded one tester. Also, if you're trying to go minimal waste, leave the filters at home and rinse out the excess grounds after brewing. "This was the most transportable and lightweight coffee accessory we tested," summed one tester.

Capacity: 1 cup | Weight: 0.4 ounces | Packed dimensions: 4.2 x 4.2 x 0.5 inches

GSI Outdoors Java Drip
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

Best Tea and Coffee Combo: MSR Mugmate

MSR Mugmate
TripSavvy / Nick Kova.
What We Like
  • Makes it easy to be planet-friendly

  • Very lightweight and compact, so good for backpacking and car camping

  • Could also be used to brew at home

What We Don't Like
  • One tester thought the coffee was too bitter and sludgy

Weighing just under an ounce, the MSR Mugmate is another solid option if you're looking for a coffee maker to work double-duty for your car camping and backpacking trips. It's a straightforward concept: Put your coffee or tea in the filter, close the filter off, place the filter in your mug, pour hot water, and let it brew.

Our testers enjoyed how simple it is to use this coffee maker but noted not to ground your coffee too finely. "You kind of have to know what kind of grounds will work with the product for it to be successful," one tester said. But, our testers appreciated how easy it was to clean with relatively minimal water and liked how compact and durable it is.

Capacity: 1 cup | Weight: 1 ounce | Packed dimensions: 3.5 x 3.5 x 3 inches

MSR Mugmate
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

Best for Espresso: Wacaco Minipresso GR

Wacaco Minipresso GR

Courtesy of Wacaco

What We Like
  • Very good coffee

  • Easy to clean

What We Don't Like
  • A lot of pieces made it somewhat confusing

While the AeroPress above is solid for its ease of use and backcountry chops, the Wacaco Minipresso GR wins by producing a better cup of espresso. "The coffee is really good," one tester said. "It pulls a decent shot of espresso; very rich and flavorful but not bitter at all and does not taste burnt." Our testers also loved how easy it was to clean this product.

However, the amount of pieces included with the Minipresso GR gives it a bit of a learning curve. "This is so much effort for one little shot of espresso," one tester said. But, other testers noted, "it's not a hard process once you learn how to do it." Our recommendation? Try it a few times at home before taking it to the woods. The upshot: If having a coffee shop-style espresso is a goal for you while camping (we totally understand!), the Minipresso GR is our best recommendation.

Capacity: 70 milliliters | Weight: 13 ounces | Packed dimensions: 6.89 x 2.75 x 2.36 inches

Wacaco Minipresso GR
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

Final Verdict

If you want a reliable cup of coffee while camping out in the wilderness, go with the Sea to Summit X-Brew Coffee Dripper (view at Amazon). This extremely portable and durable pour-over coffee maker can be used anywhere. If you prefer a simple press in a cup, we recommend the Bestargot Camping Titanium Frech Press (view at Amazon). And if a budget option is what you're looking for, check out the Primula Brew Buddy (view at Amazon).

Coffee Gator French Press testing
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

Other Products We Tested

Faberware Classic Yosemite (view at Amazon): Our testers saw this as a standard home stovetop option rather than a camping one (although it could be used for car camping). But, they also found it a bit too bulky and the coffee too weak in taste.

Stanley Adventure Camp Perculator (view at Amazon): Weighing in at 1.3 pounds, Stanley’s Adventure Cool Grip Camp Percolator is your campsite's reliable workhorse. Made of 18/8 BPA-free stainless steel, the 1.1-quart vessel brews six cups of coffee utilizing the stove-friendly percolating process to extract the pure flavors of your beans while preventing unwanted grounds from appearing in your mug. It is a modernist improvement on the traditional fire-side percolator; it comes with everything you need to get started—add water and coffee and crank up the camp stove. The hinged flip-top lid makes it easy to open, while the silicone grip on the handle shields you from burns. The silicone grip also comes off when you’re ready to clean the coffee maker, either by hand at camp or in the dishwasher when you get home.

Coffee Gator French Press (view at Amazon): We recommend the Coffee Gator French Press for intermediate coffee brewers. While the instructions were clear, this press involved a two-step steeping process and took us nine minutes to brew. This coffee maker is a durable albeit convoluted option.

Jetboil Flash Java Kit (view at Amazon): If you're looking to combine your backcountry cook kit with your coffee maker, the Jetboil Flash Java Kit is a good option. It's Jetboil's Flash backcountry stove combined with a press. We've used this in the backcountry for years, and while we appreciate its minimalist approach, we usually prefer a specific coffee maker.

Eureka! Camp Café (view at Amazon): Capable of getting 60 ounces of water to a boil in six minutes (with a standard 10K BTU burner), the Camp Café from Eureka! can provide 12 cups of coffee, ample fuel for even the largest of camp outposts. The 2.5-liter kettle uses Flux Ring technology to increase heat efficiency, and both the boil pot and carafe are made of durable hard-anodized aluminum. It also comes with a spoon to measure coffee grounds and a food-grade, BPA-free pour-over filter that fits a size #4 filter. The whole operation nests inside the boiling kettle for easy transport.

Hario Pour Over Coffee Starter (view at Amazon) The brewing process, brew quality, and cleanup for the Hario Pour Over were all fine. But our testers didn't find it very portable, and a significant glass component makes it not the ideal camping option.

Camp coffee maker testing
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

Product Selection

We selected products for testing based on our previous knowledge of camping coffee makers and the brands that make them. We also selected products based on the volume and quality of online reviews on sites like Amazon and REI. Lastly, we looked at products other publications had featured. Once we had a list of more than two dozen, we whittled it down to 18 products to test in our Brooklyn testing lab. For the 18 we tested, we made sure to include various styles of camping coffee makers and price ranges.

How We Tested

Each product was tested in our Brooklyn testing lab, and some have been used for years by our writers and editors camping and in the backcountry. We had testers remove the coffee makers from their packaging and follow the instructions to brew coffee for the lab testing. We then taste-tested the coffee to assess the quality of the brew. Once the taste-testing was complete, we cleaned the coffee makers in a camp sink. They then tested durability and portability by placing the coffee maker in a backpack with other items and dropping the pack from a ladder. We tested coffee makers for ease of use, brew quality, ease of cleaning, portability, and durability and rated each category and coffee maker on a five-point scale where one was poor and five was excellent.

Camp coffee maker testing
TripSavvy / Conor Ralph.

What to Look for in a Camp Coffee Maker

Weight and Size

Your intended camping or backpacking plan—and taste for coffee—will determine what type of coffee maker to purchase. If you mainly car camp, your coffee maker's weight and size are less important. But, if most of your camping involves backpacking, weight and size quickly become significant. If the coffee taste is something you value, we suggest picking a coffee maker for car camping and one for backpacking.

Brew Style

Your brew style preference will also play a role in your purchasing decision. Generally, the pour-over options mentioned above will be the lightest and most durable, but companies are increasingly making presses and percolators compact and portable. But this comes down to which style of coffee you prefer.

Durability

We recommend considering rubber and titanium coffee makers for the materials' strength, durability, and light weight. (Although, some BPA-free hard plastics are also good bets.) You'll want a coffee maker that can last a long time and survive falls and drops. We do not recommend glass French presses, often found for at-home presses.

Frequently Asked Questions
  • What is the easiest way to make coffee while camping?

    The easiest way to make coffee while camping is how you’re most comfortable with! In all honesty, the easiest way is probably to consider instant coffee. While we really like some of the newer instant coffees coming on the market (they’re not your grandmother’s instant coffee), we prefer the ritual and mindfulness involved in brewing coffee while camping. But for camping and backpacking, ease comes less from brewing and more from cleaning. Consider that water is likely limited (and even if it isn’t limited, you should consider limiting your water usage while camping and backpacking). You’ll want a product that is easy to clean with minimal water and waste.

  • Is a French press, percolator, or pour-over better for camping?

    Again, this has to do with your preference and intended use. If you plan on mainly car camping, a stovetop percolator will work. If backpacking is your primary camping mission, consider something lightweight and collapsible—usually a pour-over accessory. And if you’re looking for an in-between, a French press style might be the better option.

Why Trust TripSavvy

Nathan Borchelt has been camping all his life and drinking coffee at campgrounds for decades. His travels have varied from luxe car camping, a lifestyle that affords the patient beauty of pour-over perfection, to hours-long backpacking slogs in the rain, conditions saved by the ingestion of coffee in the quickest way possible. In that time, he’s had coffee prepped in pretty much every way, from tossing grounds into a pot of boiling water and dealing with the grit to perfecting the art of brewing in a French press coffee maker.

Nathan Allen is TripSavvy's Outdoor Gear Editor. He's been camping and backpacking his entire life and drinking coffee and tea for the past 15 years. His current go-to's are the GSI JavaPress, which he used for his primary coffee maker for six months while living in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and the AeroPress.

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