The 8 Best All-Mountain Snowboards of 2019

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The Rundown

Best Overall: Burton Custom X Snowboard at Amazon

"This stiff and aggressive board can handle the park and the powder."

Best Value: Ride Warpig Snowboard at Amazon

"Its sidecut delivers reliable grip and lets the board rip in practically any condition."

Best for Freestyle: Lib Tech T.Rice Orca Snowboard at Amazon

"Delivers an ultra-smooth ride thanks to its basalt core and directional shape."

Best for Women: Capita Equalizer Snowboard at Amazon

"Designed to transfer from street-snowboarding to the backcountry."

Best for Powder: Jones Ultra Mountain Twin Snowboard at Amazon

"Offers serious float and employs a serrated edge to hold on hardpack and ice."

Best for Beginners: Salomon Sight Snowboard at Amazon

"Made to squash vibrations and reduce rider fatigue."

Best Alternative: DC Mega Snowboard at Amazon

"This true twin-tip is more at home in the streets, the parks, and the pipe."

Best Twin-Tip: Never Summer Proto Type Two Snowboard at Backcountry

"Excels at making each return to earth smooth and effortless."

Our Top Picks

01 of 08

Best Overall: Burton Custom X Snowboard

Considering that Jake Burton essentially created the sport of snowboarding, the Custom X Camber all-mountain snowboard proves the brand has never stopped innovating. This stiff and aggressive board can handle the park and the powder, but it really conquers every type of on-piste terrain, from groomers to hard pack to the glades. An aggressive rocker-camber-rocker profile adds pop and drive, with a directional shape that has a longer nose to butter and float, as well as a shorter tail to provide a bit of playful pop. The board also employs Burton’s Squeezebox profile, a maze of softer and thicker zones with a powerful core that delivers loads of energy transfer. The core is composed of four separate sections of wood inserts with the grain running perpendicular to the center woods to increase strength and edge control. A stretch of 45-degree carbon runs tip to tail between the fiberglass layers, with other variable-angled fiber elements to make the ride playful and easy to maneuver. The waist width grows with the board length, starting at 248 mm (for 150-cm boards) to a fat-and-happy 266 mm when you up to 166 cms.

Looking for other gear? See our round-up of best snowboard boots on the market today.

02 of 08

Best Value: Ride Warpig Snowboard

The go-to for intermediate and advanced resort riders, the Ride Warpig boasts a tapered bi-radial sidecut that delivers reliable grip, forgives on hard landings, and lets the board rip in practically any condition. The core — a mix of aspen, bamboo, and paulownia — hits the sweet spot between lightness and strength, while the unconstructed upper (no top sheet, with graphics integrated directly on the fiberglass) further reduces heft without impacting seasons-long rigorous use. The true twin-board construction also makes it at home in the park or pipe, with a directional shape with rockers at the tip and tail and a touch of camber between the bindings. Ride also uses its proprietary Slimewall sidewalls on the Warpig, a urethane configuration that absorbs impacts rather than bouncing off the terrain (similar to the way skateboard wheels don’t make the rider feel every pebble in the road). An X-shaped network of carbon stringers run under each binding that responds to commands seamlessly from any stand width or pressure angle. All in all, the board is fun, durable, and a true charger.

03 of 08

Best for Freestyle: Lib Tech T.Rice Orca Snowboard

The brainchild of freestyle snowboarder phenom Travis Rice, the T.Rice Orca delivers an ultra-smooth ride thanks to its basalt core and directional shape that's ready to conquer the powder and inevitable crud — the hallmark realities of freestyle snowboarding. Lib Tech’s “steak knife” tech in the sidewalls, or the strategically placed sections of serrated metal, provides confident edge control in an instant, even on the iciest nightmares of a New England winter. Additionally, a wave-shaped lengthened camber mixed with a shortened rocker lets the rider play and pop on everything from powder to hardpack. Its 25.5-cm waist (which increases by only one cm if you go with a longer board) also helps you find an edge without catching one, with a floaty nose to deliver loose-powder face shots and a power tail to keep you surfing through the deep.

Take a peek at some of the other best freestyle snowboards you can buy.

04 of 08

Best for Women: Capita Equalizer Snowboard

Designed by pro-rider Jess Kimura to capture the requirements necessary to transfer from street-snowboarding to the backcountry, the Equalizer is for female riders who demand all-mountain performance. Rather than relying on traditional rocker/camber profiles, this ride comes with a flat kick tech at the tip and tail to pop into powder, along with “mode” reverse camber at the front, a positive camber under the center, a flat section just past the back binding, and then a touch of reverse camber at the back. The result: playful responsiveness in the kinds of variable conditions you encounter on the mountain as you blast from deep bowl to groomer and then into the glades. The medium-flex board provides solid pop without sacrificing stability, and a mix of a PLT top sheet, triaxial fiberglass, and a super-gliding Quantum Drive base — all wrapped around an Ashpop core — makes the board ideal for durability and max control. Board length ranges from 142 to 154 cm, with a max waist of 24.7 cm, robust enough to handle riders up to 190 pounds.

Take a look at other product reviews and shop for the best snowboard bindings available online.

Continue to 5 of 8 below.
05 of 08

Best for Powder: Jones Ultra Mountain Twin Snowboard

For those snowboarders who define “all-mountain” as “powder” and anything that stands between them and that loose, deep snow, the Ultra Mountain Twin may be your ride. Marketed as a freeride board, as well as the weapon of choice for world tour champ Sammy Luebke, the true twin-tip board boasts rocker at the tip and tail to offer serious float, along with camber underfoot and Traction Tech 2.0 that employs a serrated edge to hold on hardpack and ice. A progressive sidecut lets you trigger smooth turn initiation and exit, while layers of Triax fiberglass increases responsiveness. The triple-density full-wood core includes paulownia along with bamboo stringers that work with basalt stringers for improving torsional response and power transfer, cutting the inevitable noise and chatter as it cuts through crud or bites for an edge on the ice. The snowboard definitely tips the scales towards a stiff ride, which makes it powerful — but proves less forgiving. Beginner riders should hold off until their skills level up.

06 of 08

Best for Beginners: Salomon Sight Snowboard

The directional twin-tipped Sight from Salomon employs a rocker-camber-rocker profile for float and solid control, but beginners are sure to appreciate the two-mm rubber blocks integrated into the board’s high-pressure zones of the sidewalls to squash vibrations and reduce rider fatigue. This forgiving, responsive ride also blends elliptical curves in its overall shape to make fluid transitions. Strips of high-density aspen sit at the core, providing a predictable, solid flex in everything from hardpack to spring slush. It’s not the poppiest of boards but it can handle modest jumps and park laps, where its playfulness accommodates the ever-growing ambitions of the beginner rider.

Get ready for the slopes and shop for the best snowboard pants available today.

07 of 08

Best Alternative: DC Mega Snowboard

Given that DC got its start making skateboard shoes, it only feels natural that the company (now owned by Quicksilver) makes some of the most skateboard-like snowboards on the market. Take the Mega, for instance: this medium-stiff ride uses a “lock and load” camber profile through its mid-section to create a snappy, responsive ride, buoyed by the pop-enhancing Fresh Deck top sheet that mirrors the feel of a new skate deck. In addition to its lightweight and strong all-poplar wood composition, DC has integrated fiberglass to enhance edge-to-edge transfer, with a sintered base to glide across all surfaces, from loose powder to hardpack. But don’t mistake this all-mountain board for a powder monster; this true twin-tip is more at home in the streets, the parks, the pipe, and the groomers. In other words, it excels at all the things you’d hit if you could ride your skateboard on the mountain.

08 of 08

Best Twin-Tip: Never Summer Proto Type Two Snowboard

Never Summer Proto Type Two Snowboard

Courtesy of Backcountry
https://www.backcountry.com/never-summer-proto-type-two-snowboard

 

A true twin-tip snowboard, the Proto Type Two from Never Summer excels at making each return to earth smooth and effortless. A mixture of base carbon, which radiates out in an X pattern underneath each binding, pairs with a V-shaped stretch of carbon at the top of the board to deliver equal control in either stance, with quick edge-to-edge transfer and smooth glide across the hardpack. In addition to a slight rise at both the tail and tip, they’ve also integrated camber under each boot, with a bridge of a rocker between the bindings to let you float in powder and pop as you angle into each trick. Elastomeric stabilizers underfoot lessen the impact from jumps, while a power-grip sidecut cuts into the ice and hardpack without dragging in the deep stuff. The rig rides on a super-light wood core, with layers of fiberglass for torsional stability and sintered sidewalls and base for effortless, speedy glide.

Still can't decide on what you want? Our round-up of the best snowboard brands can help you find what you're looking for.

Our Process

Our writers spent 3 hours researching and testing the most popular all-mountain snowboards on the market. Before making their final recommendations, they considered 12 different all-mountain snowboards overall, screened options from 10 different brands and manufacturers, and read over 30 user reviews (both positive and negative). All of this research adds up to recommendations you can trust.

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