Arizona Scorpions - Photo Gallery #2

  • 01 of 18

    Arizona Bark Scorpion - Male

    Scorpion in North Scottsdale
    © James Kennedy, used with permission.

    The Scorpion Most People Fear is the Arizona Bark Scorpion

    There are more than 40 species of scorpions in Arizona. The Arizona Bark Scorpion is the only species that is really of concern to most people, since it is the one with powerful enough venom to cause harm as a result of a sting. The Arizona Bark Scorpion isn't very big -- usually no more than three inches in length. They are very common in the Phoenix area. Unfortunately for people who have a fear of scorpions, they do not stay outside; they can be found inside many homes around the Valley of the Sun.

    If you have taken a photo of an Arizona scorpion (or your hand or foot after having been stung by a scorpion) and you would like to submit the picture for inclusion in this photo gallery, here is how you do it. please include the general part of town where the photo was taken. Your photo might also be featured in the About.com Phoenix newsletter!

    See More Photos of Arizona Scorpions in Gallery #1!

    If you've photographed an Arizona scorpion (or your hand or foot after being stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture, here's how you do it.

     Readers share their scorpion sting experiences!

    Continue to 2 of 18 below.
  • 02 of 18

    Arizona Bark Scorpion

    Arizona Bark Scorpion
    © Sunny, used with permission.

    If you've photographed an Arizona scorpion (or your hand or foot after being stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture, here's how you do it.

    From the photographer: "This Arizona Bark Scorpion was alive inside our dishwasher handle in San [Tan] Valley (Johnson Ranch). I went to place my left hand into the handle to open the dish washer and was stung 4 times by this critter and since I was never stung by anything, ever, I did not realize what happened. The stings I received felt like I was being electrocuted. Within seconds, my left forefinger, where I was stung began to feel as if it were on fire and the pain was so terrible that it was doubling me over with intense pain. After killing this critter, I washed the affected finger with both hot and cold water along with dish soap, applied cold packs and took 800mg of Ibuprofen. One hour later, I was in the ER and was given pain medicine, anti-nausea medication, Tetanus Booster and a Whooping Cough vaccine. According to the doctors in the ER Arizona scorpions carry Tetanus and Whooping Cough. For the next several days, my entire left hand and arm up to my elbow was numb. A few days later, just the finger where I was stung was still numb and this lasted for a little over one-week. Needless to say, I never want to be stung by one of these things ever again and to this day, I am fearful of opening the dishwasher."

    Want to share your scorpion sting experience? Here's how you do it.

    Continue to 3 of 18 below.
  • 03 of 18

    Arizona Bark Scorpion

    If you've photographed an Arizona scorpion (or your hand or foot after being stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture, here's how you do it.

    Want to share your scorpion sting experience? Here's how you do it.

    Continue to 4 of 18 below.
  • 04 of 18

    Giant Desert Hairy Scorpion

    Giant Desert Hairy Scorpion
    © Paul Martin, used with permission.

    This is a picture of a Desert Hairy Scorpion (Hadrurus arizonensis). While they are not as venomous as the Arizona Bark Scorpion, they do sting so be careful when picking one up -- or don't!

    If you have taken a photo of an Arizona scorpion (or your hand or foot after having been stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture to this photo gallery, here's how you do it.

    Continue to 5 of 18 below.
  • 05 of 18

    Female Arizona Bark Scorpion

    Tucson Scorpion
    © Allikat3467, used with permission

    If you've photographed an Arizona scorpion (or your hand or foot after being stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture, here's how you do it.

    Readers share their scorpion sting experiences!

    Continue to 6 of 18 below.
  • 06 of 18

    Arizona Bark Scorpion With Newborns

    Arizona Bark Scorpiosn with Newborns
    © Karie Pesserillo, used with permission

    If you've photographed an Arizona scorpion (or your hand or foot after being stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture, here's how you do it.

    Readers share their scorpion sting experiences!

    Continue to 7 of 18 below.
  • 07 of 18

    Scorpion - It's Dead

    surprise scorpion
    © Ron Cada, used with permission

    If you've photographed an Arizona scorpion (or your hand or foot after being stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture, here's how you do it.

    Readers share their scorpion sting experiences!

    Continue to 8 of 18 below.
  • 08 of 18

    Giant Desert Hairy Scorpion - It's Huge!

    Waddell scorpion
    © Barbara Dodds, used with permission

    If you've photographed an Arizona scorpion (or your hand or foot after being stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture, here's how you do it.

    Note from the About.com Phoenix Guide: Notwithstanding the perspective of this photo, I assure you that this scorpion was not as big as bicycle handlebars! The photographer let me know that it was about three inches long.

    Readers share their scorpion sting experiences!

    Continue to 9 of 18 below.
  • 09 of 18

    Arizona Bark Scorpion Under UV Light

    Arizona Bark Scorpion under UV Light
    © Ryan Lamprecht, used with permission

    Not all scorpions in Arizona are Bark Scorpions. Here are some tips for identifying local scorpions.

    If you have taken a photo of a scorpion (or your hand or foot after having been stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture to this photo gallery, here's how you do it.

    Readers share their scorpion sting experiences!

    Continue to 10 of 18 below.
  • 10 of 18

    Arizona Bark Scorpion With Babies

    Arizona Bark Scorpion With Babies
    © Chasity Brown & Jason Everett, used with permission

    Not all scorpions in Arizona are Bark Scorpions. Here are some tips for identifying local scorpions.

    If you have taken a photo of a scorpion (or your hand or foot after having been stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture to this photo gallery, here's how you do it.

    Readers share their scorpion sting experiences!

    Continue to 11 of 18 below.
  • 11 of 18

    Momma and Babies

    Arizona Scorpion With Her Young
    © deg farrelly, used with permission

    Aw, even baby scorpions are cute. Kind of.

    Not all scorpions in Arizona are Bark Scorpions. Here are some tips for identifying local scorpions.

    If you have taken a photo of a scorpion (or your hand or foot after having been stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture to this photo gallery, here's how you do it.

    Continue to 12 of 18 below.
  • 12 of 18

    Stung!

    Scorpion Sting
    © Katherine Brooks, used with permission

    This is what Katherine's arm looked like after being stung by a scorpion. She isn't positive, but assumes it was an Arizona Bark Scorpion.

    Not all scorpions in Arizona are Bark Scorpions. Here are some tips for identifying local scorpions.

    If you have taken a photo of a scorpion (or your hand or foot after having been stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture to this photo gallery, here's how you do it.

    Continue to 13 of 18 below.
  • 13 of 18

    Giant Desert Hairy Scorpion

    Giant Desert Hairy Scorpion
    © Adrian Madison, used with permission

    Read more about the Giant Desert Hairy Scorpion (Hadrurus arizonensis).

    Readers share their scorpion sting experiences!

    If you have taken a photo of an Arizona scorpion (or your hand or foot after having been stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture to this photo gallery, here's how you do it.

    Continue to 14 of 18 below.
  • 14 of 18

    Striped Tail Scorpion

    © Tiffany Hawkins, used with permission

    The Striped Tail Scorpion (Vaejovis spinigerus) is venomous, but the venom is not considered dangerous.

    From the photographer: "I found this scorpion when I picked up a medium sized rock in my yard in Ahwatukee October 28, 2014."

    If you have taken a photo of an Arizona scorpion (or your hand or foot after having been stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture to this photo gallery, here's how you do it.

    Continue to 15 of 18 below.
  • 15 of 18

    Cleaned Out the Storage Shed

    © Gary, used with permission

    Not all scorpions in Arizona are Bark Scorpions. Here are some tips for identifying local scorpions.

    If you have taken a photo of a scorpion (or your hand or foot after having been stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture to this photo gallery, here's how you do it.

    Continue to 16 of 18 below.
  • 16 of 18

    Scorpions Like Water

    Bark Scorpion
    Fairen Hartunian, used with permission

    Fairen from Michigan was a house guest at her in-laws' home in Phoenix when she discovered other house guests, not necessarily invited. One was near the pool outside, and the other was in the bathtub.

    Not all scorpions in Arizona are Bark Scorpions. Here are some tips for identifying local scorpions.

    If you have taken a photo of a scorpion (or your hand or foot after having been stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture to this photo gallery, here's how you do it.

    Continue to 17 of 18 below.
  • 17 of 18

    Scorpion Under Blacklight

    Scorpion Under Blacklight
    Lamandalynne Promise, used with permission

    From the photographer: "We find these at our home outside of Phoenix. We're so sick of them. I have a horrid reaction to the sting that causes me to get emergency medical attention."

    Not all scorpions in Arizona are Bark Scorpions. Here are some tips for identifying local scorpions.

    If you have taken a photo of a scorpion (or your hand or foot after having been stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture to this photo gallery, here's how you do it.

    Continue to 18 of 18 below.
  • 18 of 18

    A Nasty Sting

    Stung by a Scorpion
    Trish Keen, used with permission

    From the photographer: "I believe I was bitten by an Arizona Bark Scorpion in NW Valley near 83av/Pinnacle Peak. It has been extremely painful, swollen, burning and itching like crazy!"

    Not all scorpions in Arizona are Bark Scorpions. Here are some tips for identifying local scorpions. If you have been stung by an Arizona scorpion, here is what you should do.

    If you have taken a photo of a scorpion (or your hand or foot after having been stung by a scorpion) and you'd like to submit the picture to this photo gallery, here's how you do it.