Festivals in April in Germany

What's on in Germany in April

Traveling to Germany in April? This is a great month to visit and it is traditionally filled with Easter holidays, spring festivals and celebrations of the arts. You should also expect a flood of travelers around Easter break. Accommodation and transport may be more expensive and crowded than usual.

As to the weather, it is warmer than just a month ago but the the Germans have a saying about April:

April, April, du weißt nicht was der will (April, April it doesn't know what it wants)

Visitors can expect rain, sunshine, or hail - sometimes all within an hour. Pack for every scenario.

Find out what annual events and festivals are happening in Germany in April.

  • 01 of 08
    Frankfurt Spring Fair
    GettyImages / kontrast-fotodesign

    Frankfurt's annual spring festival, or Dippemess, is one of the largest folk festivals in the Rhine region.

    The fair dates back to the 14th century when it was a medieval market for pottery. Its ceramic bowls and pots (called "dibbes" in the Frankfurt dialect) are well-known and responsible for the name of the festival. Today, the spring fair is also popular for rides, roller coasters, and fireworks.

    If you miss it during this season, this festival comes again in fall. Other Spring Festivals take place in Munich, Stuttgart, Nuremberg, and many other southern cities.

    When: April 12 - May 5, 2019
    Where: Fairground on Ratsweg, Frankfurt

  • 02 of 08
    Spargel Beelitz
    GettyImages / Sean Gallup

    Germans are obsessed with spargel (white asparagus). It is on every menu, every grocery store, and devotees plan trips to the farms where it is grown. Join the happy hordes to eat the "king of vegetables" at its source. 

    The states of Baden-Württemberg and Lower Saxony are two of the most important asparagus growing regions. Every stand claims to grow the best Spargel, but the only way to know for sure is to tour them all.

    When: April - June 24th
    Where: Spargel is found everywhere in Germany with farms open for visits in Baden-Württemberg, Lower Saxony, and Beelitz

  • 03 of 08
    Weimar, Bauhaus-Museum
    Andreas Praefcke/Wikimedia Commons

    The city of Weimar is the birthplace of the Bauhaus movement, which revolutionized architectural and aesthetic concepts in the 20th century. To experience this transformative style, take part in guided art walks, following the footsteps of famous Bauhaus artists like Walter Gropius, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, and Lyonel Feininger.

    The project, originally created by students, is now led by prospective architects, civil engineers, cultural scholars and artists. No registration is required. The Bauhaus Walk is in German with English walks on request. The short 1.5 hour walk is 6 euro, with the long 2.5 hour walk 9 euro.

    When: April to October - Tuesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday at 14:00; November to March - Friday and Saturday 14:00
    Where: Bauhaus Atelier in the courtyard of the main building of the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Geschwister-Scholl-Straße 6a, 99423 Weimar - Meeting point for the Bauhaus Walk.

  • 04 of 08
    Bonn Cherry Blossom Avenue
    Jordan Wilms

    Bonn's cheery trees have earned it a place on the list of "Top 10 Most Beautiful Tree Tunnels In The World". Heerstrasse in the Nordstadt neighborhood is known as "Cherry Blossom Avenue". The long limbs of the trees are weighed down with blooms, creating a tunnel-like canopy.

    Submit your best pic in the Cherry Blossom Photo Contest and attend the city's Kirschblütenfest. This festival celebrates the blossoms among the trees with fruit wine, local cuisine, and live performances.

    When: Blossoms for about 2 weeks in April-May
    Where: Bonn

    Continue to 5 of 8 below.
  • 05 of 08
    Bavarian Opera House
    GettyImages / Thomas Robbin 

    Opera found a home in Munich in 1653 and the love affair continues. Every spring, the Bavarian State Ballet puts up its "Ballet Weeks".

    This extraordinary dance festival includes modern and classical dance, which are performed by the Bavarian State Ballet as well as international guest ensembles. 

    When: April 11 – 18, 2019
    Where: Bavarian State Opera, Munich

  • 06 of 08
    Art Cologne
    GettyImages / Andreas Rentz

    The world's oldest art fair began in 1967 Cologne and is still going strong.

    Art Cologne features 200 leading galleries from around the world, exhibiting modern and contemporary art in every medium from paintings to sculpture to installation to photography. About 60,000 visitors attend each year.

    When: April 12 - 14, 2019
    Where: Exhibition Center Cologne and various Cologne museums

  • 07 of 08
    Easter fountain, Pottenstein, Upper Franconia, Bavaria
    Getty Images / Andreas Strauss

    Easter is one of the most popular holidays in Germany. It is celebrated over a long weekend including Good Friday and Easter Monday (public holidays) with school holidays for the two weeks surrounding that weekend. 

    In almost any town you will see spring flowers on display and traditional ostereierbaum (Easter trees). Eggs are still hand-blown and delicately decorated in the traditional method. And chocolates are everywhere, including the Italian-born and German-adored Kinder Surprise (Kinder Überraschung).

    When: April 19 - April 22, 2019 public holidays
    Where: Everywhere in Germany

  • 08 of 08
    Walpurgisnacht
    GettyImages / Sean Gallup

    Walpurgisnacht is the time for witches. According to German folk lore, this is the night when the witches fly to Mount Brocken in the Harz Mountains to hold a celebration awaiting the spring. You don't need to be a witch to celebrate, however.

    Today many people light bonfires and dance to the light of the flames. In cities like Berlin, this is another excuse to party and rebel with special club openings, night-time parades and demonstrations.

    When: April 30
    Where: Most places in Germany

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